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Marijuana’s Ten Biggest Victories Of 2018

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This year was a pivotal one for marijuana.

It began with then-U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions sending waves of uncertainty and fear over the cannabis industry and legalization supporters on January 4, when he formally rescinded Obama-era guidelines protecting state marijuana laws.

But as 2018 went on, even more states ended up changing their laws to allow for legal recreational or medical cannabis use despite the conflict with federal law. Efforts to end national prohibition in Congress picked up steam as well. And several nations moved to significantly overhaul their marijuana laws.

Here’s a look back at marijuana’s 10 biggest victories of the year:

Lawmakers Start Passing Marijuana Legalization Bills

It didn’t take long for pro-legalization forces to get a victory on the board after Session’s anti-cannabis attack. Just hours later, on the very same day¬†the attorney general threw the previous administration’s federal¬†cannabis protections in the trash,¬†Vermont lawmakers voted to approve a marijuana legalization bill. Gov. Phil Scott, a Republican, went on to sign the legislation, which allows adults to grow and possess small amounts of cannabis but does not provide for a system of legal sales. That made Vermont the first state in the nation to enact legalization by an act of lawmakers instead of through a ballot initiative.

In September, lawmakers in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), a U.S. territory, also¬†enacted a marijuana legalization bill¬†that was later signed into law by Gov. Ralph Torres (R). Unlike the Vermont policy,¬†CNMI’s approach does¬†include legal cannabis commerce. The territory, which previously did not have a medical marijuana law, became the first place in the U.S. to go straight from having cannabis illegal across the board to allowing recreational use.

These two new laws‚ÄĒsigned¬†by Republican governors‚ÄĒmark an evolution in the country’s¬†move toward legalization. Whereas the other states that had previously ended prohibition did so through acts of voters, it is now clear that politicians are comfortable enough with the issue to take matters into their own hands.

Three Red States Legalize Medical Cannabis

Support for marijuana reform transcends party lines, a political reality made clear by the fact that voters in Missouri, Oklahoma and Utah all¬†overwhelmingly approved medical cannabis ballot measures¬†this year while at the same time voting to elect Republicans to the U.S. Senate or nominate conservative candidates for statewide office.¬†In Oklahoma, medical marijuana¬†was on the primary election ballot‚ÄĒa situation legalization supporters have long sought to avoid because younger and more progressive voters who have been thought more likely to support cannabis reform don’t¬†show up as reliably in non-presidential elections. But the¬†decisive win in the red state during an off-year primary shows that¬†medical cannabis can pass almost anywhere any time¬†it is put before voters, whether presidential years, primaries or midterms.

First Midwestern State Legalizes Marijuana

During¬†last month’s midterms, voters in¬†Michigan¬†strongly¬†approved a ballot measure¬†making their state the fist in the Midwest to legalize adult-use marijuana. No longer¬†relegated¬†to the coasts, legal markets for recreational marijuana are now an emerging nationwide trend.¬†Separately, while not nearly as far-reaching as ending prohibition and allowing legal sales, voters in¬†five Ohio cities also approved local cannabis decriminalization ballot measures¬†on Election Day, signaling that a regional Midwest movement for marijuana reform is on the rise.

Pro-Legalization Candidates Win Governors’ Races

Aside from the wins at the ballot box for cannabis measures this year, voters also elected a number of new governors who campaigned on promises to legalize marijuana.

In Illinois, Democrat J.B. Pritzker sailed to victory after a campaign in which he made marijuana legalization a centerpiece of his platform. Minnesota Gov.-elect Tim Walz (D), who has worked on cannabis issues in Congress, also backs ending prohibition.

In addition to approving a legalization ballot measure, Michigan voters elected Gretchen Whitmer (D), who publicly supported the initiative and called cannabis an “exit drug” away from opioids, as governor. In New Mexico,¬†Michelle Lujan Grisham (D), who won the governor’s race, said¬†legalizing marijuana¬†will¬†bring ‚Äúhundreds of millions of dollars to New Mexico‚Äôs economy.” Connecticut Gov.-elect Ned Lamont (D) said that¬†legalizing marijuana will be among his “priorities”¬†in 2019.

While reelected New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D)¬†previously called marijuana a “gateway drug,”¬†in recent months he¬†appointed¬†a working group to draft¬†a bill to end cannabis prohibition¬†for lawmakers to consider in 2019, and the chances of that passing were improved as ¬†Democrats took control of the state’s Senate in the midterms.

Members of Congress Act To Fix Federal-State Marijuana Gap

The rapid evolution of the politics of marijuana isn’t¬†just happening on the state level. Many more members of the U.S. House and Senate became active in the fight to end federal cannabis prohibition in 2018.

More than just¬†being ineffective in¬†stopping states from changing their marijuana laws, Sessions’s¬†anti-cannabis move seems to have¬†actually spurred more federal lawmakers to¬†view ending national prohibition as an important issue, with¬†dozens of members of Congress quickly weighing in¬†on the need for reform¬†in the wake of his rescission of the Obama-era memo.

One legislator, Sen. Cory Gardner (R-CO), went so far as to place a hold on President Trump’s Justice Department nominees over the dispute.

And while congressional Republicans blocked dozens of cannabis amendments, refusing to allow any to reach the House floor for votes, more bills to end or amend federal marijuana prohibition were filed in the 115th Congress than ever before, and they garnered record numbers of cosponsors.

And with the Democratic takeover of the House in the midterms, many observers believe that the chamber will pass far-reaching marijuana reforms in the 116th Congress, a plan for which Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) laid out in a¬†comprehensive step-by-step “blueprint” toward federally legalizing cannabis in 2019.

Longtime Prohibitionists Flip To Support Marijuana Reform

Several of the lawmakers who vocally spoke out for ending federal marijuana prohibition this year have historically been actively hostile to cannabis reform.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), long one of Congress’s most ardent legalization opponents, announced during the course of a tough primary challenge that she finally came around to the notion that her constituents who follow California cannabis laws¬†shouldn’t be arrested by federal narcotics agents.

Feinstein’s home state colleague, Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), who many believe to be preparing for a 2020 presidential run, once simply laughed in the face of a reporter who asked her about marijuana legalization. Now, the former prosecutor is all-in on¬†ending prohibition, signing her name this year onto a far-reaching bill that would¬†punish states with discriminatory cannabis enforcement.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY), who has rarely met a federal drug criminalization policy he didn’t like,¬†changed his mind on marijuana in 2018 and filed his own bill to¬†remove cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act.

And one of the Democratic Party’s rising stars, Rep. Joe Kennedy III (D-MA), who opposed legalization in his home state of Massachusetts and consistently voted against even limited medical cannabis amendments in Congress, also¬†evolved and now supports legalization.

While it is likely true that some of this position flipping is at least partially motivated by genuine rethinking about the policy of prohibition, it’s hard to believe that politics doesn’t have something to do with it as well. Polling now consistently shows that a¬†growing majority of¬†the country¬†supports legalizing cannabis. Gallup, for example, found in October that 66% of Americans‚ÄĒincluding a majority of Republicans‚ÄĒare now on board with legalization.

This new politics of marijuana is likely to become more and more apparent to politicians who are still reluctant to embrace cannabis reform as a growing number of states change their laws.

President Trump Voices Support For Marijuana Bill

In a situation that stemmed directly from¬†his own attorney general’s¬†anti-cannabis moves, President Trump ended up lending his support to a bill¬†to¬†end federal marijuana prohibition.

Following Gardner’s¬†blocking Justice Department nominees in protest of Sessions’s rescission of the Obama-era marijuana memo,¬†the senator spoke directly with the president and elicited a pledge¬†for the administration to respect¬†local legalization laws in exchange for lifting his hold. Following that, he teamed up with Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) to file legislation to shield state marijuana policies from federal interference.

When asked about the proposal during an impromptu press conference outside the White House, Trump said he “really” supports the bill, a comment that made him the¬†first sitting president to embrace legislation to end the federal prohibition of marijuana.

Hemp Is About To Become Legal

After decades of being caught up in the broader prohibition of cannabis, marijuana’s non-psychoactive cousin hemp is poised to finally become a legal crop.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), no fan of marijuana, nonetheless actively¬†championed the legalization of hemp¬†through this year’s Farm Bill, going so far as to take the unusual step of naming himself to the conference committee charged with reconciling the Senate version, which had his hemp language in it, with the House version, which did not.

McConnell and other congressional leaders announced recently that the¬†negotiated¬†bill that will be sent to President Trump’d desk includes provisions to¬†finally and officially remove the crop from the Controlled Substances Act. The legislation, which will bolster the growing market for hemp-derived cannabidiol (CBD), is expected to be enacted by year’s end.

Canada Legalizes Marijuana

In addition to having prohibition-free zones within its own borders in a growing number of states, the U.S. now has a whole country where cannabis is legal just over its northern border.

While Canada is the second nation in the world to end prohibition after Uruguay, it is the first major global economic player to do so. The move has spurred the creation and growth of several huge publicly traded cannabis companies.

As the Canadian system of legalization gets off the ground, it is likely to spur the U.S. and other nations to more seriously consider modernizing their approaches to marijuana.

Mexican Presidential Administration Backs Legalizing Cannabis

Speaking of legalization just over U.S. borders, the new administration of Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, which took office this month, is already making moves to end cannabis prohibition.

In late October, the nation’s Supreme Court¬†struck down the criminalization of using, possessing and growing personal amounts of marijuana¬†as unconstitutional. But L√≥pez Obrador’s team was already considering legalization even before the ruling. Weeks earlier, members of his incoming cabinet¬†spoke about cannabis policy with Canadian officials¬†during a trip to that country.

Subsequently, Sen. Olga S√°nchez Cordero¬†filed a bill to legalize and regulate cannabis¬†production and sales. She is now the nation’s interior secretary. The government hasn’t said when it plans to push the legislation, but its party and partners control the legislature, so advocates expect that the U.S. could soon be surrounded on both its northern and southern borders by countries where marijuana is legal nationwide.

There May Still Be More Marijuana Wins By The End Of The Year

Aside from the seeming inevitability that more states will legalize marijuana and federal reform efforts will progress in 2019, it is possible that there are still more huge cannabis wins yet to come before 2018 is over.

For example, lawmakers in New Jersey advanced a marijuana legalization bill out of committee last month. Gov. Phil Murphy (D) supports ending prohibition, and the legislation could still end up on his desk for signing by the end of the year.

In any case, 2018 has already been a year that saw marijuana policy reform significantly advance on the state, federal and international levels, a scenario that bodes extremely well for the legalization movement heading into 2019.

This piece was first published by Forbes.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.

Tom Angell is the editor of Marijuana Moment. A 15-year veteran in the cannabis law reform movement, he covers the policy and politics of marijuana. Separately, he founded the nonprofit Marijuana Majority. Previously he reported for Marijuana.com and MassRoots, and handled media relations and campaigns for Law Enforcement Against Prohibition and Students for Sensible Drug Policy. (Organization citations are for identification only and do not constitute an endorsement or partnership.)

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Trump’s New White House Chief Of Staff Supports Marijuana Reform

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President Trump announced on Friday that Mick Mulvaney will serve as his acting White House chief of staff, a move that could bode extremely well for federal marijuana reform efforts in 2019.

Mulvaney, who currently serves as director of the Office of Management and Budget and acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, was previously a member of the U.S. House, where he consistently voted to support marijuana reform amendments and cosponsored cannabis bills.

In 2015, for example, he voted for a floor amendment that would have barred the Justice Department from spending money to interfere with state marijuana laws. The proposal, which came just nine flipped votes short of passage, would have expanded on existing protections for state medical cannabis programs by covering recreational laws as well.

Mulvaney also voted for the medical marijuana rider three years in a row.

In 2014, 2015 and 2016, he supported amendments to allow Department of Veterans Affairs doctors to recommend medical marijuana to military veterans.

Mulvaney backed a 2014 amendment to prevent the Treasury Department from punishing banks that work with marijuana businesses.

The South Carolina congressman he also voted for an amendment to protect limited cannabidiol (CBD) medical cannabis laws as well as a number of proposals concerning industrial hemp.

He also signed his name on as a cosponsor of several pieces of standalone marijuana legislation, including a comprehensive bill to reschedule cannabis and protect state medical-use laws, a measure to allow banking access for marijuana businesses, a hemp legalization bill and two separate CBD proposals.

“Mulvaney‚Äôs history of opposing wasteful government spending and support for states’ rights, specifically when it comes to marijuana, makes him our strongest ally in the White House,” Don Murphy, director of federal policies for the Marijuana Policy Project, told Marijuana Moment.

Pointing to how the Office of Management and Budget under Mulvaney on several occasions has floated severe funding cuts for the Office of National Drug Control Policy, commonly known as the drug czar’s office, Murphy said that¬†the new acting chief of staff “delivers our ‘more liberty/less spending’ position directly into the Oval Office on a daily basis, where it could bring the federal war on marijuana to an end by 2020.”

It is unclear how long Mulvaney will serve as acting chief of staff, or how frequently marijuana issues will come across his desk, but the fact that he‚ÄĒand not an ardent legalization opponent like Chris Christie, who was also under consideration for the job‚ÄĒwill sit a door away from the Oval Office is likely to be seen as a positive development for cannabis reform supporters.

In his new capacity, Mulvaney will be party to conversations about which congressional legislation the president should back as well as discussions about potential marijuana enforcement policy changes at the Department of Justice under a new attorney general.

Congressman Issues ‘Blueprint To Legalize Marijuana’ For Democratic House In 2019

This story has been updated to include comment from MPP.

Photo courtesy of Gage Skidmore.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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New York Governor Will Outline Plan To Legalize Marijuana On Monday

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) will lay out his agenda for the upcoming legislative session in a speech on Monday, and that will include details on his plan to get an adult-use marijuana legalization bill through the state legislature in 2019.

In an interview with radio station¬†1010 WINS on Friday, the governor confirmed that a proposal to end cannabis prohibition would be one of 15 pieces of legislation he’ll discuss in the speech. He said the current “political atmosphere” is “unlike anything we’ve ever seen before,” and the timing is ripe to promote a bold agenda.

Listen to Cuomo confirm plans to reveal marijuana legalization details on Monday, about 5:00 into the clip below:

(In the exchange, the host mistakenly asks about “medical” marijuana, which is already legal in New York.)

In a separate interview on¬†WCNY’s Capitol Pressroom, Cuomo said the Monday speech “is going to get to the meat of the specific legislative issues.¬†This is not going to be a lot of rhetoric and retrospective.”

“We have an incoming [Democratic majority] legislature and I wanted to say, ‘these are the 15 things I’m trying to get done this year, and these are the 15 bills you’re going to see.'”

While reforming marijuana laws hasn’t always been a top priority for the governor, who as recently as a year ago called cannabis a “gateway drug,” 2018 has seen Cuomo’s position on the issue evolve dramatically. In August, he formed a working group to draft a legalization bill after the state Department of Health released a report finding that the benefits of legal cannabis outweigh the consequences.

Cuomo is also rumored to be considering putting cannabis legalization in his 2019 budget, which is set to come out next month. If he did so, New York could have a “fiscal framework for the program” by April, according to¬†Crain‚Äôs.

It remains to be seen whether Cuomo will talk about a proposal to use revenue from legal marijuana sales to improve New York City’s subway system‚ÄĒa notion that’s put some lawmakers and advocates at odds‚ÄĒor if he will address details such as cannabis businesses licensing structures or whether he believes home cultivation should be allowed.

New York Cannabis Clash: Should Marijuana Taxes Fund Subways Or Social Justice?

Photo courtesy of Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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Missouri Lawmaker Moves To Block Feds From Getting Medical Marijuana Patient Info

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Missouri officials would be prohibited from sharing information about registered medical marijuana patients with the federal government under a new bill pre-filed by a state lawmaker on Thursday.

Voters in the state approved one of three competing medical cannabis initiatives during November’s midterm elections. So if the new legislation passes, patients enrolled in the program wouldn’t have to worry about the state outing them to the feds, who still regard cannabis as a strictly controlled illegal substance.

Any state official who did share medical marijuana patient info with a federal agency would be committing a felony under the proposal.

Missouri Rep. Nick Schroer (R) is sponsoring the bill, which states:

“1. Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, no state agency shall disclose to the federal government the statewide list of persons who have obtained a medical marijuana card.

2. Any violation of this section is a class E felony.”

Federal prosecution of medical marijuana patients or providers is rare‚ÄĒthe Justice Department is barred from using federal dollars to enforce prohibition in medical cannabis states‚ÄĒbut not entirely unheard of.

“It‚Äôs very, very unlikely that there’s going to be [federal] targeting of individual customers,” Tamar Todd, legal director for the¬†Drug Policy Alliance, told PolitiFact earlier this year. “Many, many other targets would come first.”

Still, Schroer’s bill would at least provide a safeguard in the event that the government radically shifts its drug enforcement policy. And it sends a strong message that state officials want the feds to respect their rights to enact their own marijuana laws without any kind of interference.


Marijuana Moment is currently tracking more than 900 cannabis bills in state legislatures and Congress. Patreon supporters pledging at least $25/month get access to our interactive maps, charts and hearing calendar so they don’t miss any developments.

Learn more about our marijuana bill tracker and become a supporter on Patreon to get access.

The new Missouri bill is one of several that have been pre-filed for 2019 in states from Nevada to Texas.

Marijuana Bills Are Already Being Pre-Filed For 2019 Legislative Sessions

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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