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Seven Governors Talk Marijuana Policy At Annual Conference

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Seven governors from across the country discussed marijuana issues at an annual policy conference on Friday. Like last year’s event, the elected officials touched on a wide range of cannabis issues, from social equity to federal reform to competing with other legalized states. One even joked about growing marijuana in the governor’s mansion…

Here’s a roundup of what the governors said at Politico’s State Solutions forum:

Illinois Gov. J. B. Prtizker (D)

The governor spoke extensively about his state’s efforts to promote social equity in its adult-use cannabis market. Pritzker, who signed a bill making Illinois the eleventh state to legalize for recreational purposes last year, said equity is the “the prime component” of the policy change.

Mass pardons and expungements are part of the administration’s focus, he said. One day before the state’s legal marijuana market launched last month, Pritzker announced that his office had pardoned more than 11,000 people. But he said that ultimately an estimated “300,000 people in our state will either be pardoned and have their records expunged or their arrest record will be taken away” under the new system.

Job and housing opportunities are impacted by criminal records for cannabis offenses, he continued, and a disproportionate amount of convictions have fallen on minority communities.

Part of the tax revenue from marijuana sales will go toward those communities, a move aimed at “reversing the damage” of prohibition, the governor said.

Unlike other states that have pursued legalization through a ballot initiative process, Illinois was the first to establish a tax-and-regulate cannabis market through an act of the legislature. Lawmakers took “very intentional” steps over two years in crafting the bill to ensure that its system had equity provisions in place, he said.

“What we wanted to do was make sure that people—not just people of color but people traditionally who haven’t been able to get into business from neighborhoods all over the statewide—have a shot at this,” he said. “So we created a program that does that.”

“The way we started this industry was we wanted to make sure it was highly regulated and that we were managing that regulation properly,” he said, adding that part of that process involved allowing existing medical cannabis shops to have a leg up in the adult-use market. The problem, he said, is that the previous governor’s administration approved licenses for medical marijuana businesses that were all owned by white males. “There’s nothing horribly wrong about it, but there’s no diversity,” he said.

To increase diversity, Illinois is prioritizing new entrants to the industry who are from communities most impacted by the war on drugs.

“We are very focused on having the social equity component be successful,” Prtizker said. “And that’s why so many other states that are on the verge of legalizing cannabis are looking at what we did and calling us and asking, ‘what did you do—how do we get that done in our state?'”

Pritzker also talked about how regulated markets can combat the illicit trade and also mitigate public health risks associated with buying cannabis products—including vape cartridges associated with lung injuries—that aren’t tested for quality standards.

“There’s going to be a black market of some sort. The question is are you managing this properly?” he said. “In Illinois, we had deaths from synthetic marijuana. Then there were deaths from the use of illegally manufactured THC cartridges for vaping devices.”

“What you get now when you go to a dispensary—a legal dispensary in the state of Illinois—is a product that you know is safe.”

“It’s safely manufactured,” he said. “It’s been tested.”

“We’re being very careful about that and I think that’s the advantage people find and the reason you don’t want to go find some dealer that’s going to sell you something that you don’t know what’s in it, you don’t know where it came from. That’s why I think people are showing up at the dispensaries and we had a great first month,” he said, referencing Illinois’s roughly $40 million in cannabis sales in January.

“We’re on our way, and I think we’re doing it in the right way and being very careful and we’re making adjustments…because this is new thing for Illinois and frankly still relatively new in the nation,” Pritzker said.

Colorado Gov. Jared Polis (D)

Polis was asked to share his thoughts on what would be the best option for Colorado marijuana businesses: opening the market nationally or insulting state markets.

“The more we move towards a competitive industry the better. I think Colorado businesses are ready to compete,” he said. “If you open up nationally, you have the issue, in many of our neighboring states, it remains illegal. You can’t transport it across Kansas if it’s illegal in Kansas even if it’s legal to take it across the border.”

“Colorado says, bring it on. We’re excited to move in this direction nationally, and Colorado led the way as one of the first two states to legalize recreational cannabis and we are ready to compete on a national and international stage,” he said.

The governor also touted Colorado’s “really thriving cannabis industry,” which includes industrial hemp.

That said, Polis said he’s cognizant of the fact that more states are pursuing legalization and he wants to ensure that Colorado has the most effective system in place.

“We have a more mature industry than other states. We want to keep that advantage because they’re going to catch up,” he said.

“We want to be ready for the next stage.”

Part of the involves opening the marijuana market to outside investors, letting cannabis companies go public and finding solutions to the lack of financial services available to the industry. He addressed those former issues through legislation he signed last year, and Polis said the banking problem could be resolved through House-passed legislation that would protect financial institutions from being penalized by federal regulators for working with state-legal marijuana companies.

“We’re doing everything we can under our state authority to make sure that cannabis legal companies have access to financial services,” he said.

Polis’s administration recently released a roadmap to to provide cannabis businesses in the state with access to financial services.

Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo (D)

The governor, who recently included marijuana legalization language in her annual budget proposal, clarified that she’s not personally enthusiastic about ending cannabis prohibition in the state and acknowledged that during her first years in office, “I resisted it.” But, she said, Rhode Island is a “tiny state” surround by jurisdictions that have either legalized marijuana or are taking steps to do that, and so regulating the market is necessary.

“If you talk to the state troopers that police our highways or you talk to teachers in schools, they will tell you, ‘governor, it is here.’ Whether you like it or not, it is here,” she said, adding that her office “is about a 10 minute drive” from a dispensary in neighboring Massachusetts, “so to pretend that we don’t have adult-use marijuana in Rhode Island is silly.”

“Let’s have a responsible way to regulate adult-use marijuana.”

Raimondo tempered expectations about tax revenue from legal cannabis sales and said “at the end of the day, it’s not the money.”

“Sometimes it takes more than a year to get a good idea done,” Raimondo said, referring to reluctance that leading lawmakers have expressed about legalization. “If we don’t do it this year, maybe next year. To my mind it’s inevitable and we should just be smart about it.”

North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum (R)

Burgum was asked about how his state’s voters approved a medical cannabis ballot measure in 2016 but rejected a broader marijuana legalization initiative in 2018.

“I haven’t supported recreational but I did support medical,” he said, noting that he also launched a program aimed at pardoning people with past marijuana convictions.

“This war on drugs has turned out to be a war on people who have a disease,” he said. “If you’ve got a chronic, progressive and ultimately fatal disease and we try to handle that problem with punishment and imprisonment it’s cost the most and has the leas efficacy for solving it.”

Watch Burgum’s marijuana comments 49:45 into the video below:

North Dakota voters may see another marijuana legalization measure on the ballot again this year, but Burgum is concerned about the conflict with federal law.

“As long as the federal government is opposing it and you can’t bank the dollars that come up, you end up with a huge black market cash economy,” he said. “I’d like to have the feds catch up with that.”

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R)

Hogan’s cannabis conversation focused on how the state’s medical marijuana system wasn’t effectively implemented despite his support for the policy change.

“It happened actually right before I became governor under the previous governor—it was passed by the legislature and the law just wasn’t written very well, so they’ve had difficulty in awarding the licenses,” he said. “There was some concerns about, you know, the way it was implemented. But it’s finally starting to happen and it’s, you know, it’s getting straightened out.”

Watch Hogan’s marijuana comments 45:50 into the video below:

While lawmakers in the legislature have talked about the prospect of legalizing marijuana for adult use, “it doesn’t look as if that’s going to move forward any time soon,” he said. “The legislature has said they’re not going to bring that up.”

Utah Gov. Gary Herbert (R)

Herbert discussed his state’s steps toward implementing legal medical cannabis after voters overwhelmingly approved a 2018 ballot measure on the topic, which lawmakers then replaced with an alternate legislative proposal.

“It’s just a matter of evolving to where we need to be to address the market demands, and that’s yet to be determined. So starting small is easier than starting with too many and then having to cut back,” he said, referring to how only a handful of dispensaries are set to open next month. “I think we’re doing it in the right methodical, careful way.”

Asked to address his past opposition to medical cannabis, the governor talked about the need for more scientific research.

“If in fact there’s medical properties for use of cannabis, marijuana, we ought to know what they are,” he said. “There ought to be testing, scientific analysis and do the things that are necessary to get a drug approved like we do with typical FDA approval. What we have now is just anecdotal story, and that’s not to discount the anecdote, but that’s not how we in fact decide whether a substance should be controlled, prescribed by a doctor, administered and at what doses.”

“If it’s going to be a medicine, we ought to treat it like a medicine,” he said.

Watch Herbert’s marijuana comments 1:03:50 into the video below:

Herbert also criticized the federal government for dragging its feet on cannabis issues and fostering a situation where a growing number of states are changing laws while national prohibition remains in effect.

“We’re tired of waiting,” he said. “The federal government simply turns a blind eye to the enforcement of the law.”

“There’s still work to be done and I just think the federal government’s been very slow to come to the forefront on this very emotional issue.”

“Let’s help the banking industry,” Herbert continued. “We can’t even buy this stuff here without violating federal law and making it a problem for the banks.”

Guam Gov. Lou Leon Guerrero (D)

Leon Guerrero, who signed a bill legalizing marijuana in the U.S. territory last year, spoke about how the new law, as well as a medical cannabis one that voters approved in 2014, is still in the process of being implemented.

“We haven’t really gotten much revenue from it because we’re still working the rules and regulations,” she said.

Watch Leon Guerrero’s cannabis comments, about 29:40 into the video below:

Noting the fact that possession and low-level home cultivation is legal, she joked that she hasn’t personally taken advantage of those provisions of the policy.

“I was looking to see if there’s a place at the government house to grow six plants,” she said.

Colorado Marijuana Legalization Would Be Overturned By New Ballot Measure

Photo courtesy of Mike Latimer.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.

Kyle Jaeger is Marijuana Moment's Los Angeles-based associate editor. His work has also appeared in High Times, VICE and attn.

Politics

Missouri Marijuana Legalization Campaign In Jeopardy Due To Coronavirus

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Coronavirus has dealt another blow to the marijuana reform movement. This time, activists in Missouri announced on Saturday that their effort to put a cannabis legalization measure on the ballot has “no practical way” of succeeding amid the pandemic.

In recent weeks, the outbreak of COVID-19 has resulted in business closures and increased calls for social distancing in states across the country. That has made mass signature gathering for drug policy reform measures virtually impossible.

“Unfortunately, while there is widespread support from Missourians to tax and regulate marijuana, there is currently no practical way during the COVID-19 outbreak to safely, publicly gather the 170,000 plus signatures needed over the remaining 6 weeks to put this on the Missouri ballot in 2020,” John Payne, campaign manager for Missourians for a New Approach, said.

He added that the group is still “exploring our options at this point” but if it ultimately cannot find a path to the ballot for this November, “our supporters from every corner of this state will be back next cycle to put this on the 2022 ballot and finally bring Missouri the benefits of a safe, adult-use marijuana program.”

A total of 160,199 valid signatures from registered voters are needed in order to qualify the measure for this year’s ballot, and the campaign says it has so far collected roughly 80,000—though it is unclear how many of those have been validated. Organizers have aimed to collect more than needed in case some submissions are not accepted.

In a separate email circulated to supporters earlier on Saturday, Dan Viets, coordinator for Missouri NORML and an advisory board member for Missourians for a New Approach, said the “status of the effort to legalize adult use of marijuana in Missouri this year is unclear.”

“No official decision has yet been made regarding whether to suspend the campaign,” he said. “If we do so, it is likely we will return to pursue this goal in 2022.”

“It is, of course, virtually impossible to effectively gather signatures on petitions given the response to the coronavirus pandemic. Gatherings of more than a very few people in any one place have been banned. Almost all colleges and universities have switched to online teaching. No large meetings, conferences, or other gatherings are taking place. We should know within a very short time whether the campaign will be continuing this year or not.”

The language of the campaign messages indicates that activists aren’t entirely throwing in the towel just yet. But that’s a change of tone compared to a message sent to key organizers earlier this month by Graham Boyd, director of the national New Approach PAC, which has been a chief funder of the Missouri effort.

Boyd wrote in the March 17 email obtained by Marijuana Moment that after “much deliberation, we’re making the very difficult, but ultimately unavoidable, decision to end our 2020 adult-use legalization effort in Missouri.”

“As you can imagine, the onset of the coronavirus situation has made that already difficult process essentially impossible,” he said at the time, adding that after discussing the issue with reform campaigns in other states, it “seems likely that the situation will get much worse in many more states before it gets better.”

Since then, organizers have worked to try to salvage the effort.

Activists officially started signature gathering for the Missouri campaign in January, and they were optimistic that voters in the state would embrace the reform move. The proposed initiative would allow adults 21 and older possess and purchase cannabis from licensed retailers and cultivate up to three plants for personal use.

Additionally, it would impose a 15 percent tax on marijuana sales, with revenue going toward veterans services, substance misuse treatment and infrastructure projects. Individuals with cannabis convictions would be empowered to petition for resentencing or expungements.

Boyd stressed in his email that cancelling the campaign would be a “temporary setback” and that it’s “clear from the work and polling we’ve done so far that voters in Missouri are ready to approve a marijuana legalization law.”

Beyond Missouri, coronavirus has already proven to be a formidable presence in 2020 politics, with multiple drug policy reform campaigns having been impacted by the public health crisis.

Activists in California recently released a video asking California officials to allow digital signatures for a petition to revise the state’s adult-use marijuana program. In Washington, D.C., advocates for a measure to decriminalize psychedelics similarly wrote to the mayor and local lawmakers, imploring them to accept online signatures for their ballot petition.

Another California campaign to legalize psilocybin mushrooms is struggling and asking for electronic signature gathering to qualify for the ballot. An effort to legalize medical cannabis in Nebraska is facing similar signature gathering challenges.

In Oregon, advocates for a measure to decriminalize drug possession and a separate initiative to legalize psilocybin for therapeutic purposes have suspended in-person campaign events amid the pandemic.

Arizona activists shared some more positive news this week, however, announcing that they have collected more than enough signatures to qualify for the state’s November ballot—though they have not yet been submitted to or verified by the state.

Arizona Marijuana Activists Have More Than Enough Signatures To Put Legalization On Ballot, They Say

Photo courtesy of Philip Steffan.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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Scientists Sue DEA Over Alleged ‘Secret’ Document That Delayed Marijuana Research Expansion

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The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is finding itself in court over marijuana again after scientists filed a lawsuit against the agency, requesting “secret” documents that they allege DEA used to delay action on expanding cannabis research.

The Scottsdale Research Institute (SRI) is behind the suit. It’s one of more than 30 organizations that have submitted applications to DEA to become licensed cannabis manufacturers for research purposes.

Some background should be noted: In 2016, DEA announced it would expand marijuana research by approving additional growers beyond the sole source that has existed for half a century at the University of Mississippi. But after more than three years, applicants heard silence, and SRI filed an initial lawsuit alleging that the agency was deliberately holding up the process. A court mandated that it take steps to make good on its promise, and that case was dropped after DEA provided a status update.

This month, DEA finally unveiled a revised rule change proposal that it said was necessary due to the high volume of applicants and to address potential complications related to international treaties to which the U.S. is a party. A public comment period is now open, after which point the agency says it will finally approve an unspecified number of additional growers.

But what really accounted for the delay?

According to the plaintiffs in this new suit, after DEA said it would accept more cultivators, the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel (OLC) secretly issued an opinion that interprets international treaty obligations as making it impossible to carry out the 2016 proposed rule while maintaining compliance.

The new revised rule aims to address the problem, in part by shifting jurisdiction over the cannabis to a single agency, DEA, which would purchase and technically own all of the cannabis grown by approved cultivators, and would then later sell the product directly to researchers.

That OLC document, which is not public, is the basis of SRI’s Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) complaint. The case was filed with the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona on Wednesday and requests that the Justice Department be found guilty of unlawfully failing to make records available related to its interpretation of the Single Convention treaty, including the OLC opinion. It further states that DEA should release those documents and pay the plaintiff’s attorney fees.

Matt Zorn, an attorney working the case, told Marijuana Moment in a phone interview that it’s not clear what’s contained in the OLC opinion and that the uncertainty is “entirely the point” of the suit.

“I think we all know vaguely what it says—the subject matter of it—but we don’t know what it actually says,” he said. “That’s important because you need to know what that instruction was or what their interpretation of the law is to assess whether what they’re doing now is appropriate.”

The suit claims that SRI, “as a non-commercial company dedicated to advancing the state of medical care through clinical research, is directly harmed by this unlawful secrecy.”

“Because Defendants have failed to fully disclose their re-interpretation of federal law and treaty obligations as the law requires, Plaintiff lacks information necessary to protect its legal rights, including the right to have its application to manufacture marijuana for research processed in compliance with the Administrative Procedure Act and the [Controlled Substances Act],” the filing states.

SRI’s research objective for cannabis is to determine potential therapeutic benefits for veterans suffering from conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. “While DEA’s unlawful and dilatory conduct harms the public generally, the secrecy and delay have been especially harmful to our nations’ veterans,” the suit says.

“We deserve not only to know the scientific truth about medical marijuana use, but candor from our government, which includes disclosure of the ‘secret law’ the agency continues to rely on as a basis to delay and ultimately revamp the process for researching and manufacturing marijuana in this country,” the filing says. “Plaintiff brings this FOIA action so can understand the legal basis—if there is one—for the government’s conduct surrounding the Growers Program.”

While SRI acknowledged that DEA last week announced its revised rule change proposal, the suit states that the explanation about how it arrived at its determination “leaves Plaintiff and the public in the dark with respect to several critical considerations.” For example, it alleges, the notice doesn’t account for how the Justice Department advised the agency on the matter and which parts of the amended proposal would make the action compliant with international treaties.

“The answer to these questions and others presumably lies in the undisclosed OLC Opinion and related records that animated DOJ’s decision to sideline the Growers Program and prompted DEA to embark on this notice-and-comment rulemaking in the first place… In sum, using a secret OLC Opinion interpreting the CSA and a 1961 international treaty, DEA delayed processing applications to cultivate marijuana for research and now proposes to radically revamp federal law through rulemaking—rules which will loom large over the future of medical marijuana research, manufacture, and distribution going forward.”

The plaintiffs argue that DEA violated federal statute that prohibits the creation of a “secret law.” The statute says that federal agencies must make records—including final opinions and policy interpretations not published in the Federal Register—public.

“To block the Growers Program, DOJ formulated—through the OLC Opinion and related records—and DEA adopted to an undisclosed interpretation of the Single Convention and federal law contrary to the view espoused and published by DEA in the August 2016 Policy Statement, and contrary to the view of the State Department,” it continues, apparently referencing a letter the State Department sent to a senator in response to questions about the role of international treaties as it concerns expanding cannabis cultivation facilities.

In that letter, the department said nothing about the Single Convention prevents member nations from increasing the number of such facilities. “If a party to the Single Convention issued multiple licenses for the cultivation of cannabis for medical and scientific purposes, that fact alone would not be a sufficient basis to conclude that the party was acting in contravention of the Convention,” it read.

Read the State Department’s responses on international treaties and marijuana below:

State Dept Response on Single Convention by Marijuana Moment on Scribd

If the new lawsuit’s allegations prove accurate, it could help explain the role of former Attorney General Jeff Sessions, the anti-marijuana official who was reportedly involved in blocking research expansion.

The suit, which was first reported by Politico, goes on to say:

“For more than three years, Defendants relied on this undisclosed interpretation, contained in the OLC Opinion and related records, to make an end-run around the Administrative Procedure Act by unlawfully withholding and unreasonably delaying agency action on marijuana cultivation applications. The OLC Opinion has guided DEA’s actions—and its inaction… The government’s unlawful conduct under FOIA prevents Plaintiff and those similarly situated from timely and effectively vindicating legal rights under the Administrative Procedure Act, effectively rendering its protections and judicial review provisions meaningless.”

To resolve the issue, SRI said it wants DEA to be held accountable for violating federal law, release the documents and compensate them for the legal action. While this is a FOIA-related suit, the institute didn’t first seek the documents through a standard document request but instead filed the case under the law’s “Reading Room provision” that allows courts to force federal agencies to put records online, according to a Ninth Circuit ruling last year.

Sue Sisley, a researcher with SRI, told Marijuana Moment that the institute has generally had a good relationship with DEA over the years and doesn’t expect that it would unduly deny their application in retaliation for the institute’s repeated legal actions against the agency.

“I couldn’t fathom that that would happen, but I hope that the merits of our application are so clear that it would carry us forward,” she said. However, these licensing agreements are “not always a merit-based process so it is possible that if politics get deeply involved here that there could be a situation where licenses are awarded to friends of the government. We’re still praying that there is some merit-based system.”

Researchers and lawmakers have made clear that the current availability of federally authorized cannabis for research raises questions about the accuracy of tests that rely on it, as the quality is insufficient. As of now, there’s only one facility at the University of Mississippi that’s authorized to grow cannabis for researchers. The products developed at the university have been widely criticized by scientists and lawmakers. A study indicated that the facility’s cannabis is chemically more similar to hemp than marijuana available in state-legal markets.

“If adopted, these proposed rules would radically overhaul how medical marijuana manufacture and research will proceed in this country,” the plaintiffs wrote. “Better supply is needed for better research, and better research is needed not only because millions use medical marijuana every day, but also to facilitate informed policymaking at the federal and state levels, including legislation and drug scheduling decisions.”

Read the full lawsuit against DEA below:

SRI FOIA Complaint by Marijuana Moment on Scribd

Federal Agency Touts Hemp Progress While Refusing To Serve Marijuana Businesses

Photo courtesy of Mike Latimer.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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First Legal Marijuana Home Deliveries Begin In Colorado

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For the first time, people in Colorado will be able to legally have marijuana products delivered directly to their homes starting on Friday.

The launch of the limited program focused on medical cannabis patients comes one week after the dispensary chain Native Roots announced that its Boulder location The Dandelion had received the state’s first marijuana delivery license. And while the license wasn’t related to the coronavirus outbreak, the timing is opportune, as officials have increasingly cautioned against leaving home to avoid catching or spreading the virus.

The delivery service will be limited to patients living in either Boulder or Superior. They must also be registered with the dispensary, and those who are not already signed up must do so in-person for the time being—though Native Roots said it is “looking into a compliant, remote solution for patient registration.”

Native Roots said there is a $100 minimum purchase, and they’re encouraging patients to pay with a debit card rather than cash, presumably because drivers could be targets of burglaries if they’re transporting large amounts of cash or because of concerns that money changing hands could further the spread of COVID-19.

Cannabis delivery services are a new feature of Colorado’s legal marijuana program. Gov. Jared Polis (D) signed legislation last year allowing the option, though individuals jurisdictions must proactively opt-in, so as of now that number of cities permitting deliveries is limited. Native Roots said it’s been engaging with local governments about the issue for months.

Deliveries for recreational cannabis consumers won’t begin until January 2021 under the law.

As more businesses shutter as a result of the pandemic, there’s growing demand for alternative means of obtaining marijuana products, and several states have taken steps to address that concern by encouraging deliveries and curbside pickup, for example.

For patients and reform advocates, that represents an ideal solution compared to closing dispensaries altogether. Numerous legal states have categorized cannabis shops as essential services that are exempt from mandates to close down. And according to a poll released this week, a majority of Americans agree with that decision.

But while the market remains largely operational in the midst of this health crisis, reform advocates across the U.S. are feeling the impact and struggling to continue campaign activities, including in-person signature gathering.

Campaigns to change state marijuana programs, legalize psilocybin mushrooms, legalize psilocybin for therapeutic purposes, legalize medical and recreational cannabis, decriminalize psychedelics and broadly decriminalize drug possession have all faced challenges amid the pandemic, and several have implored officials to allow electronic signature gathering to overcome the barrier.

An exception to this appears to be Arizona, where activists recently said they’ve collected more than enough signatures at this point to qualify for the state’s November ballot.

Arizona Marijuana Activists Have More Than Enough Signatures To Put Legalization On Ballot, They Say

Photo courtesy of Philip Steffan.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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