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Tulsi Gabbard Talks CBD For Military Members, Biden’s Legalization Opposition And Congressional Retirement

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Over her eight years in Congress, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) quickly established herself as a leading advocate for marijuana and hemp reform by introducing numerous pieces of cannabis legislation and actively working to build bipartisan support around the issue.

And while the congresswoman will be retiring after this session, she’s made clear she plans to keep pushing legislative reform until her last day on Capitol Hill—and beyond. Last month, for example, she filed an amendment to allow military service members to use hemp-derived CBD at a time when multiple branches are expanding their ban. The House approved the measure, and now it remains to be seen if it can survive bicameral negotiations with the Senate.

A military veteran herself, Gabbard says the non-intoxicating cannabinoid represents a promising alternative treatment for those on the front lines and argued, contrary to military leaders, that it can actually improve readiness. And while it remains to be seen whether her measure will make it to the president’s desk, she says moving leadership in that direction will be a priority in the weeks ahead.

Marijuana Moment caught up with the congresswoman, who made legalization a centerpiece of her 2020 Democratic presidential campaign, in a phone interview. She discussed her amendment, the evolving politics of cannabis reform, former presidential primary opponent Joe Biden’s opposition to marijuana legalization and more.

Marijuana Moment’s Patreon supporters can listen to the audio recording of our conversation with Gabbard. In addition to the topics covered in this publicly available writeup of the interview, the congresswoman also talks about whether she has plans to join the cannabis industry after leaving Congress and reacts to the Democratic National Committee’s refusal to endorse legalization.

The exclusive audio clip is available for supporters who help make our cannabis journalism possible with monthly pledges of $10 or more.

This premium content is available only for Marijuana Moment supporters on Patreon. Please start a monthly pledge to help us continue our cannabis advocacy journalism. (Please contact [email protected] if you are a patron and have trouble logging in.)

This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity. 

Marijuana Moment: I wanted to start by asking about your CBD amendment. What motivated that, and have you heard from service members about the need for this legislation?

Tulsi Gabbard: I have, and it really came about as a result of the changes that were included in the 2018 Farm Bill that really opened a lot of doors of opportunity for more research and more products to come into the market that can help people with day-to-day ailments that, as a service member, I’m very well aware are common occurrences.

Being able to have other options of alternative forms of treatment other than, ‘Hey, just take another Motrin or prescription drug X, Y or Z’ is something that can actually increase our service members’ health and wellbeing and, ultimately, their readiness to be able to do their job.

MM: It was interesting to see just days after the House approved the measure, the Navy announced it was expanding its CBD ban, prohibiting members from using even products like hemp-infused shampoos and conditioners. What do you make of that?

TG: It seemed really strange and, frankly, almost silly. I don’t know what instigated that change, and I’m not going to make any assumptions. But, you know, it just speaks, to me, a very backward way of viewing these products and the changes that are being made in both state and federal law as it relates to CBD and hemp products.

MM: Do you have any thoughts about the prospects of advancing the amendment through the House-Senate conference committee? Are you talking to leadership about that process?

TG: It’s something we’re working on currently. I think it’s too early to say, but conference can be a place where great things go to die unfortunately so we’re trying to do as much work as we can, both with senators on the Senate Armed Services Committee—those who anticipate being in the conference committee—as well as the leadership to make sure that this and a few other key amendments that we included in the House bill actually stay in the bill.

MM: Looking back at your time in Congress, what would you say about the way its evolved on this issue?

TG: It has been interesting over my eight years in Congress to see how this issue at the very beginning of my first term in office was something that, you know, you could tell the people who were for and against. It was mostly partisan, but also just based on people saying things like, “I don’t want my kids to smoke pot” and therefore voting against any legislation that had anything to do with whether it was decriminalization as a whole or taking it off the [Controlled Substances Act] or even saying, “Hey, for states where it’s legal, we should allow people to use our banking system.”

But it’s changed, I feel, too slowly, but it is changing over the years to where we’ve built support, as we saw even recently in some amendments to the appropriations bill to people who are saying, “Hey look, this is a states’ right issue.” Those who may have been opposed traditionally are recognizing that, in states where this is legal, we should be supporting the state’s decision in that. And frankly, others who, whether through personal experience or through actually doing research, are seeing that there just are so many fear-based myths that have perpetuated opposition, where there’s actually some incredible game-changing research being done both from a medical perspective as well as from an economic opportunity perspective, as we’ve seen in Kentucky obviously.

This is something that we should support more of the exploration of and the introduction into our everyday commerce and lives.

MM: Speaking of Kentucky, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-CA) and other Republicans recently criticized House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) over her defense of including cannabis banking language in your chamber’s latest COVID-19 relief bill. They argue it’s not germane. Do you feel its a relevant provision for this legislation?

TG: I think it’s relevant because, from the data I’ve seen, the numbers of people who’ve been going to their local dispensary has dramatically increased in the midst of this pandemic. By continuing to disallow anyone associated with these industries that states have deemed legal is further perpetuating serious problems and uncertainty during time when, frankly, we need as much certainty as we can get.

Marijuana Moment asked Gabbard about whether she has plans to work in the marijuana industry following her retirement from Congress early next year, as other lawmakers have done. She also reacted to the Democratic National Committee’s rejection of a cannabis legalization platform plank. 

The congresswoman’s answers to those questions, and the full audio of our interview, are available exclusively for Marijuana Moment supporters pledging at least $10/month on Patreon.

This premium content is available only for Marijuana Moment supporters on Patreon. Please start a monthly pledge to help us continue our cannabis advocacy journalism. (Please contact [email protected] if you are a patron and have trouble logging in.)

MM: Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden remains opposed to legalizing marijuana. What message would you send to the former vice president about the importance of embracing the policy change?

TG: I would speak from personal experience—just the more information that I’ve learned, the more research that I have done, it shows how, number one, outdated our laws are as it relates to cannabis in particular and how much opportunity there is, again from a medical perspective as well as from an economic perspective, especially related to hemp, which is you know why I introduced the Hemp For Victory Act. There’s tremendous opportunity available. I would urge him to examine this information with the hopes that, with information, he would be willing to reconsider his position.

MM: A staffer to a committee chair told us recently that there are plans in the work to put House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler’s (D-NY) marijuana legalization bill on the floor for a vote in September. Have you heard anything about that?

TG: I have not, about the scheduling of it. I know that the chairman has been very committed to moving this forward and that we knew from the beginning that of any cannabis-related legislation, it would likely be something like this that would have the greatest chance of actually getting a vote on the House floor. So I’m hopeful.

MM: Are you optimistic about the prospect of legalization advancing in your state of Hawaii in the near future?

TG: I don’t know is the honest answer to that. This just shows that cannabis legislation is not limited to party lines because we’ve got a very strong Democratic legislature here in the state, obviously a Democratic governor, but there have been very strange responses, in my opinion, to some of the cannabis-related legislation. So it remains to be seen.

Just to add to that, one example that continues to perplex me is the data very clearly shown how, in states where there is some form of legal cannabis use in place, medicinal or otherwise, a direct correlation with the reduction of opioid addiction and opioid-related deaths. That’s an indisputable fact. However, even with bipartisan support, bicameral support, in the passage of legislation that would make opioid addiction eligible for medicinal marijuana use in our state, that bill was vetoed by our Democratic governor, claiming a lack of evidence and information and stating that, if proponents want to push this, they should go through the Department of Health bureaucracy to do so.

Things like that, frankly, scientifically it makes no sense. And in the way of people in a state like ours where just under, I think last time I checked, just under like 500,000 active opioid prescriptions in a state with a population of about 1.3 million people. There’s clearly an issue here, and by providing this, you give people an alternative form of treatment.

MM: Looking back at your eight years in Congress, what are you most proud of in terms of advancing cannabis reform?

TG: You know, I’ve introduced a number of pieces of legislation, amendments, provisions in larger bills throughout my time in Congress, and I appreciate having played a role in helping to build bipartisan support for some of the changes that we’ve actually seen take place.

It may sound like, “Well, that’s not much,” but when you work in a place where too many members of Congress on both sides of the aisle are unwilling to have real dialogue and conversations with one another purely because of prejudging them based on their partisan affiliation, this is exactly the only way how we’ll actually make change around these and other important issues that impact all Americans, not just those of one party or another.

MM: Is there anything else you want to add?

What’s going to be interesting is whether the Pentagon, obviously, whether officially or unofficially weighs in on [the NDAA CBD and hemp amendment]. That is going to be an issue of contention with that. We’ll see.

Become a Marijuana Moment supporter on Patreon with a monthly pledge of $10 or more to hear our conversation with Gabbard and to support our ongoing cannabis journalism that helps to keep you informed about key developments.

D.C. Would Vote To Decriminalize Psychedelics, Poll Shows

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Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.

Kyle Jaeger is Marijuana Moment's Los Angeles-based associate editor. His work has also appeared in High Times, VICE and attn.

Politics

Minnesota Marijuana Legalization Bill Clears 12th And Final House Committee, Advancing To The Floor

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A bill to legalize marijuana in Minnesota has been approved by its final House committee and will now advance to the floor.

The road to get to this position has been long and winding, with 12 panels hearing and voting on the measure since it was introduced in February.

House Majority Leader Ryan Winkler (D), Speaker Melissa Hortman (D) and other lawmakers filed the proposal, which would allow adults 21 and older to purchase and possess up to 1.5 ounces of cannabis and cultivate up to eight plants, four of which could be mature.

Members of the House Ways & Means Committee approved the legislation in a 16-10 vote on Friday.

Winkler previously said that he expects a floor vote this month, though that has yet to be scheduled. The legislature is slated to adjourn on May 17.

The bill “helps to correct wrongs that have been done for too long in Minnesota to communities who’ve been over-policed who have been targeted for cannabis enforcement to further a prohibition of cannabis that does not work,” the majority leader said in opening remarks.

Winkler said that “legalizing and creating a safe marketplace by taxing cannabis and using the proceeds from those taxes to pay for cannabis regulation to help invest in a cannabis industry” would reflect “the values of Minnesotans and help to address the harm that is caused by cannabis prohibition on our black and brown communities.”

The panel adopted an amendment from Winkler that expands the definition of social equity applicants to include those from communities disproportionately impacted by prohibition and makes changes to how regulators would address rules violations by businesses. It would also revise the amount of funding for various state agencies, including a reduction in appropriations for the Department of Corrections.

A proposal to require that the label on marijuana products include information about the maximum dose that is considered safe within a 24-hour period was also approved.

An additional amendment that would have required marijuana products to be labeled with a warning that cannabis remains illegal under federal law was rejected.

Prior to taking up the legalization bill, members adopted an amendment to separate budget legislation that would provide funding for the implementation of the cannabis program for the first biennium, after which time marijuana tax revenue would more than cover costs.

It the measure does clear the full House chamber, it’s still expected to face a significant challenge in the Republican-controlled Senate, where lawmakers have signaled that they’re more interested in revising the state’s existing medical cannabis program than enacting legalization of adult use.

That said, a GOP member of the Taxes Committee, which approved the legalization bill on Wednesday, indicated that he felt an amendment he introduced and that was adopted could bolster Republican support.

That revision from Rep. Pat Garofolo (R) directs remaining cannabis revenue to a tax relief account after implementation costs are covered and substance misuse treatment and prevention programs are funded.

“The adoption of this amendment is a gamechanger,” Garofalo said in a press release. “The Democrat majority accepting this amendment means that if signed into law, this bill will result in lowering taxes Minnesotans are FORCED to pay, financed with the revenue generated from taxes that people are CHOOSING to pay.”

Before the Taxes Committee, the bill passed the Health Finance and Policy Committee, Public Safety and Criminal Justice Reform Finance and Policy Committee, Education Finance Committee, State Government Finance and Elections Committee, Judiciary Finance and Civil Law Committee, Environment and Natural Resources Finance and Policy Committee, Agriculture Finance and Policy Committee, Workforce and Business Development Finance and Policy Committee, Labor, Industry, Veterans and Military Affairs Finance and Policy Committee and Commerce Finance and Policy Committee.

“At the beginning of the year, a House committee had never passed a legalization bill. Now, we’re on the verge of passing a bill off the House floor,” Winkler said in an email to supporters on Friday. “We have the ability to change laws in a way that improves people’s lives, whether it’s expunging cannabis-related records, targeting economic opportunity for those impacted most by the war on drugs, providing relief for veterans suffering from PTSD and serious health conditions, and more.”


Marijuana Moment is already tracking more than 1,100 cannabis, psychedelics and drug policy bills in state legislatures and Congress this year. Patreon supporters pledging at least $25/month get access to our interactive maps, charts and hearing calendar so they don’t miss any developments.

Learn more about our marijuana bill tracker and become a supporter on Patreon to get access.

The litany of committees the bill has gone through makes it perhaps the most thoroughly vetted legalization measure to move through a state legislature—and it means that a solid portion of the House has already had the chance to review, propose amendments to and vote on the legislation it as it advances to the floor, presumably increasing its chances of passage in the chamber.

The majority leader’s bill as introduced was identical to a proposal he filed last year, with some minor technical changes. Winkler, who led a statewide listening to gather public input ahead of the measure’s introduction, called it the “best legalization bill in the country” at the time. It did not advance in that session, however.

Under the legislation, social equity would be prioritized, in part by ensuring diverse licensing and preventing the market from being monopolized by corporate players. Prior marijuana records would also be automatically expunged.

On-site consumption and cannabis delivery services would be permitted under the bill. And unlike in many legal states, local municipalities would be banned from prohibiting marijuana businesses from operating in their areas.

Retail cannabis sales would be taxed at 10 percent. Part of that revenue would fund a grant program designed to promote economic development and community stability.

The bill calls for the establishment of a seven-person Cannabis Management Board, which would be responsible for regulating the market and issuing cannabis business licenses. It was amended in committee month to add members to that board who have a social justice background.

People living in low-income neighborhoods and military veterans who lost honorable status due to a cannabis-related offense would be considered social equity applicants eligible for priority licensing.

Cannabis retails sales would launch on December 31, 2022.

Gov. Tim Walz (D) is also in favor of ending marijuana prohibition, and in January he called on lawmakers to pursue the reform as a means to boost the economy and promote racial justice. He did not include a request to legalize through his budget proposal, however.

Walz did say in 2019 that he was directing state agencies to prepare to implement reform in anticipation of legalization passing.

Winkler, meanwhile, said in December that if Senate Republicans don’t go along with the policy change legislatively, he said he hopes they will at least let voters decide on cannabis as a 2022 ballot measure.

Heading into the 2020 election, Democrats believed they had a shot of taking control of the Senate, but that didn’t happen. The result appears to be partly due to the fact that candidates from marijuana-focused parties in the state earned a sizable share of votes that may have otherwise gone to Democrats, perhaps inadvertently hurting the chances of reform passing.

In December, the Minnesota House Select Committee On Racial Justice adopted a report that broadly details race-based disparities in criminal enforcement and recommends a series of policy changes, including marijuana decriminalization and expungements.

Wisconsin Governor’s Marijuana Legalization Proposal Stripped From Budget By GOP-Led Committee

Photo courtesy of Mike Latimer.

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Feds Announce New Standard THC Dose To Be Used In Marijuana Research, Effective Immediately

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A top federal health agency announced on Friday that it has determined the standard dose of THC that should be used for marijuana studies moving forward.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) said in a notice to researchers that there is a “new requirement to measure and report results using a standard THC unit in all applicable human subjects’ research,” which is effective immediately. That standard unit is five milligrams of THC.

NIDA said that inconsistencies in measuring and reporting THC exposure “has been a major limitation in studies of cannabis use, making it difficult to compare findings among studies.” Therefore, a “standardized measure of THC in cannabis products is necessary to advance research by providing greater comparability across studies of both its adverse effects and potential medical uses.”

The agency recognized, however, that “the same quantity of THC may have different effects based on route of administration, other product constituents, an individual’s genetic make-up and metabolic factors, prior exposure to cannabis, and other factors.”

But by creating a standard THC dose, it will nonetheless be easier to compare studies that involve THC exposure, which is a “high priority” of NIDA and the National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse.

“It is not the intent of this Notice to prescribe the quantity of THC that is permissible for use in research projects. Indeed, investigators are free to use more or less than 5mg of THC as appropriate for their study,” the notice states. “However, for applicable studies, investigators will be required to report the quantity of THC using the standard unit. Investigators may also report the quantity of THC in other units (e.g., milligrams) as appropriate.”

This comes one year after NIDA, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, first solicited feedback on a proposal to standardize THC content in cannabis research.

The agency said that it carried out “extensive stakeholder input,” along with “consultation with experts in the field,” to arrive at the decision to set the standard unit at 5 mg.

“This guidance will apply to applications where THC is a focus of the research,” the new notice continues. “Applicants are responsible for determining whether use of this standard unit is applicable to their research and for determining best approach to applying it in their research applications. A justification should be provided for research that does not propose to use the standard unit.”

NIDA Director Nora Volkow discussed the importance of establishing a standard THC unit in commentary published in the journal Addiction last year.

Citing research that calls for a five milligram THC standard, Volkow said she agreed with the study’s conclusion despite complicating factors. Those factors include potential issues related to the effect of having cannabis products with the same THC level but different concentrations of other cannabinoids such as CBD.

The complexities in research beyond having a standardized measure of THC “hardly negate the value” of setting one, Volkow said in her commentary. “In fact, having and using such a standard is a prerequisite for comparing the effects of various cannabis products on THC bioavailability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacological effects, which is knowledge fundamental to studies pertaining to medical use of cannabis.”

“Although cannabis remains an illicit substance in the United States, the expanded legalization by states requires us to develop the knowledge base that can help states develop policies to minimize risk from cannabis exposures, such as limits on the THC content of cannabis products,” she said.

Volkow has been vocal about the importance of streamlining and improving research into cannabis, and she’s laid partial blame for the the lack of studies on marijuana’s restrictive federal classification.

Kansas Senate Running Out Of Time To Pass Medical Marijuana Legalization Bill That Cleared House

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Kansas Senate Running Out Of Time To Pass Medical Marijuana Legalization Bill That Cleared House

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As advocates applaud the passage of a medical marijuana legalization bill in the Kansas House of Representatives, anxieties remain high over its prospects in the GOP-controlled Senate.

The chamber has days left being the end of the legislative veto session, and Senate leadership has signaled that they do not view the reform legislation as a priority.

“The Senate is not real high on the issue at this point” Senate President Ty Masterson (R) told an Associated Press reporter in a pun-filled text message on Thursday, adding that “we may roll it into a joint committee and see if we can weed out the issues.”

Whether he was serious about the joint committee or simply making an attempt at cannabis-related humor is unclear. A spokesperson for his office separately said that the chamber is focused on passing a budget bill and a school funding measure in the final days of the session.

“I can’t imagine we’d take the subject matter up this year,” Masterson said earlier this week ahead of the House vote.

If the Senate doesn’t take up the medical marijuana bill by May 11, it would still be alive for the second half of the legislative biennium that starts early in 2022 and could be acted upon then.

But even if senators do make time to establish a bicameral conference committee to consider the proposal, there are still serious doubts about whether the body would approve the resulting negotiated legislation. And defeat in the Senate this year would mean lawmakers would have to start the process all over again if they wanted to pursue the reform again next year.

Getting the bill to this stage alone has proved challenging.

It moved through the House Federal and State Affairs Committee after a series of hearings and onto the floor in March, but then it was rereferred to the panel for further consideration. Members then adopted several additional amendments before sending it back on the floor.

The legislation would establish a medical marijuana program for qualified patients. It lists about two dozen conditions that make a person eligible for cannabis, including Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, Crohn’s disease, glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury.


Marijuana Moment is already tracking more than 1,100 cannabis, psychedelics and drug policy bills in state legislatures and Congress this year. Patreon supporters pledging at least $25/month get access to our interactive maps, charts and hearing calendar so they don’t miss any developments.

Learn more about our marijuana bill tracker and become a supporter on Patreon to get access.

Smoking and vaping products would be prohibited. The bill would also not provide for home growing.

The state would license medical cannabis growers, testing labs, processors distributors and retailers, and counties would be able to opt out of allowing marijuana businesses to operate in their jurisdiction.

Patients would be able to purchase up to a 90 day supply of cannabis from licensed dispensaries, which would be regulated by the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC). That department would also be renamed the Division of Alcohol and Cannabis Control.

The secretary of the Department of Health and Environment would have to develop regulations to administer the medical cannabis program by July 1, 2023.

Gov. Laura Kelly (D), for her part, supports medical cannabis and would be expected to sign a bill if it arrived on her desk.

She pushed a separate proposal that would legalize medical cannabis and use the resulting revenue to support Medicaid expansion, with Rep. Brandon Woodard (D) filing the measure on the governor’s behalf.

Kelly has she said she wants voters to put pressure on their representatives to get the reform passed. And with the small timeline before the session’s end, the time to apply that pressure would be now.

While both pieces of legislation would make it so Kansas would join the vast majority of states that have legal medical marijuana markets, advocates view them as restrictive, particularly as it concerns the limited methods of consumption that would be permitted.

A separate medical cannabis legalization bill was introduced by the Senate Commerce Commerce in February, though it has not seen action beyond being referred to another panel.

Alabama Governor Will Give Medical Marijuana Bill A ‘Thorough’ Review, Spokesperson Says

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