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Here’s Where You Can Tell Trump To Support Marijuana Rescheduling

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As Marijuana Moment first reported last week, the Trump administration is asking Americans for input on whether marijuana should be reclassified under international law.

On Monday, the Food and Drug Administration officially began accepting online comments about the topic.

Feds Want Input On Marijuana Reclassification

Here’s what you need to know:

Currently, under both American law and global drug treaties to which the U.S. is a party, marijuana sits in the most restrictive category of Schedule I. Here at home, that means cannabis is not available for formal prescriptions and research on its effects is significantly restricted. Internationally, it means that countries signed onto drug treaties are not supposed to legalize cannabis.

But the United Nations World Health Organization is now beginning its first-ever review of marijuana’s classification, and is inviting input from member nations like the U.S.

And the Trump administration is accepting public comments that it will use to inform the the U.S.’s position on the issue before it weighs in on the global scheduling process.

Starting on Monday, and through April 23, interested persons can easily submit comments online about why the U.S. should support reclassifying marijuana.

Doing so takes only a few minutes.

Comments can run up to 5,000 characters, and people can also attach supporting documentation if they like. Commenters can choose whether or not to include their contact information along with their submissions.

If the WHO does move to support the rescheduling of cannabis under international agreements, it will likely add to pressure to change marijuana’s status under the laws of individual countries like the U.S.

Photo courtesy of Gage Skidmore.

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Tom Angell is the editor of Marijuana Moment. A 15-year veteran in the cannabis law reform movement, he covers the policy and politics of marijuana. Separately, he serves as chairman of the nonprofit Marijuana Majority. Previously he reported for Marijuana.com and MassRoots, and handled media relations and campaigns for Law Enforcement Against Prohibition and Students for Sensible Drug Policy. (Organization citations are for identification only and do not constitute an endorsement or partnership.)

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