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Trump Allies Consider Using Hemp Concrete To Build Border Wall With Private Funds

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A coalition of President Donald Trump’s allies are looking into whether they could privately fund a wall along the Mexican border…made of hemp.

Former White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon says that the group, which also includes former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and former Sheriff David Clarke, is consulting with a Kansas-based hemp company about the possibility of erecting a hempcrete wall along the southern border.

The thinking is that, because congressional Democrats are unlikely to budge and include taxpayer funds for a border wall in appropriations legislation, the group will pool their capital and influence to get the job done themselves.

“Do you understand the irony of using hempcrete to keep out marijuana?” Bannon told Politico, which first reported on the potential cannabis-constructed border barrier.

That said, when Trump has spoken about his reasons for wanting a border wall when it comes to impeding drug trafficking, he usually focuses on opioids, cocaine and methamphetamine, and hasn’t mentioned cannabis in relation to the project.

And of course, the wall isn’t singularly about preventing drug trafficking. According to Trump, it’s also meant to deter illegal immigration, which has already been decreasing steadily since 2007. The president’s claim that there’s an ongoing humanitarian crisis on the southern border that demands a physical barrier has been characterized by Democratic lawmakers as a xenophobic attempt to rally his base and make good on a campaign promise that initially involved having Mexico foot the bill.

Either way, drug enforcement officials have found that marijuana seizures have steadily declined as more states have legalized.

It’s not clear whether the president would back a proposal to erect a privately funded wall made of hemp. A White House spokesperson did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Marijuana Moment.

America’s Hemp Academy, the company that Bannon’s group reportedly partnered with, also did not reply to a request for comment by the time of publication. The company—founded by a “serial entrepreneur” who also owns a chain of delis, a bread manufacturing company and an outdoor wildlife hunting retreat—launched just two months ago, according to the Kansas City Business Journal.

One thing is for sure: using hempcrete for a large-scale infrastructure project would’ve been harder to achieve just months ago, when the crop was federally illegal to grow in the U.S. outside of limited research programs, and only imports from other countries were allowed. But since Trump signed the 2018 Farm Bill into law, legalizing hemp, more widespread domestic cultivation is on the way and costs for products like hempcrete are likely to drop.

Experts expressed strong doubts to Politico, though, that Bannon’s group could raise enough funds to actually execute their plan. Whether it’s made of hemp or some other material, coming up with enough money to build a wall stretching thousands of miles would set investors back by billions of dollars—not to mention the potential regulatory complications a private company would face dealing with federal departments like the Environmental Protection Agency.

Still, as far as border wall proposals go, a hempcrete barrier would at least represent a more environmentally sustainable material as compared to normal concrete. But again, the practical and political hurdles that the White House and outside groups face in securing funding for any kind of barrier have proved daunting.

Industrial Hemp Cultivation Exploded In The U.S. Last Year, Report Shows

Photo courtesy of Brendan Cleak.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.

Kyle Jaeger is Marijuana Moment's Los Angeles-based associate editor. His work has also appeared in High Times, VICE and attn.

Politics

Conservative Group ALEC Floats Marijuana Banking And CBD Bills For States To Consider

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An influential conservative organization is floating two cannabis-related resolutions that could be used as models for future state legislation.

Tasks forces of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), a nonprofit that brings together conservative lawmakers and private sector stakeholders to draft and distribute model policies for consideration by state legislatures, discussed banking issues in the marijuana industry and enacting hemp and CBD legalization bills at the group’s 46th annual meeting in Austin last week.

ALEC’s Commerce, Insurance and Economic Development (CIE) Task Force tackled cannabis financial services issues during Thursday’s session, weighing a draft resolution that urges Congress to “enact common-sense federal laws that respect state law and promote public safety without compromising federal enforcement of anti-money laundering laws against criminal enterprises.”

“Congress has sole authority to solve the cannabis banking issue by enacting legislation that provides protections for depository institutions that offer financial services to cannabis-related legitimate businesses and service providers for such businesses,” the resolution states.

The measure specifically says it does not take a position on marijuana legalization itself but rather focuses on how conflicting state and federal cannabis laws mean “the vast majority of financial institutions are unwilling to provide services [to marijuana businesses] and those that do could be subject to severe criminal and civil penalties.”

Because of that problem, many such businesses are operating on a largely cash basis, which ALEC described as “inefficient, expensive, opaque, and make illicit activity more difficult for law enforcement and state regulators to track.”

The resolution also emphasizes the bipartisan nature of resolving the banking issue, referencing a recent letter from 38 state and territory attorneys general that called on Congress to enact a legislative fix.

ALEC’s support for resolving financial uncertainty in the cannabis industry is just one of many recent indicators that legislation such as the Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Banking Act is considered a nonpartisan issue. The House Financial Services Committee approved the SAFE Banking Act in March, and the Senate Banking Committee held a hearing on the topic last month, despite its Republican chairman initially stating that the panel wouldn’t discuss it as long as marijuana remained federally illegal.

Over in ALEC’s Energy, Environment and Agriculture (EEA) Task Force, members debated draft legislation for states that would “legalize the agricultural production and sale of hemp as well as Cannabidiol oil, commonly known as CBD oil” but explicitly would “not legalize marijuana.”

The model policy seems to be targeted at the limited number of states that still have hemp prohibition on the books despite the crop’s federal legalization under the 2018 Farm Bill. Those states include Idaho, South Dakota and Mississippi, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Provisions of the draft policy signal that the proposal would be in compliance with federal law, which defines hemp as cannabis that contains no more than 0.3 percent THC by dry weight. However, while the 2018 Farm Bill legalized hemp and its derivatives, the Food and Drug Administration has said that unless alternative rules are issued for CBD, it cannot legally be marketed in food items or dietary supplement.

ALEC’s draft policy would provide for such marketing, though. It stipulates that CBD products that contain no THC can sold be if the product is “intended for topical application, oral consumption, or inhalation, by humans, or for consumption by animals.”

It’s not clear how the task forces voted or what exactly the immediate next steps would be if the draft proposals were approved and made final at last week’s conference. Marijuana Moment reached out to representatives of ALEC for clarification but did not hear back by the time of publication.

FBI Seeks Tips On Marijuana Industry Corruption

Photo courtesy of Mike Latimer.

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Marijuana Legalization Measure Advances One Step In South Dakota

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South Dakota’s attorney general filed an official explanation of a proposed ballot measure to legalize marijuana on Friday.

While separate organizations are working to get a medical cannabis-focused initiative on the state’s 2020 ballot, activists behind this measure are hoping to incorporate recreational legalization, medical marijuana reform and hemp into one package.

Adult-use legalization would be accomplished through a constitutional amendment under the initiative, which would separately require the legislature to pass legislation creating rules for medical cannabis and hemp.

“The constitutional amendment legalizes the possession, use, transport, and distribution of marijuana and marijuana paraphernalia by people age 21 and older. Individuals may possess or distribute one ounce or less of marijuana,” Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg (R) wrote. “Marijuana plants and marijuana produced from those plants may also be possessed under certain conditions.”

The South Dakota Department of Revenue would be responsible for issuing licenses for cannabis cultivators, manufacturers, testing facilities and retailers. Individual jurisdictions would be able to opt out of allowing such facilities in their areas.

“The Department must enact rules to implement and enforce this amendment,” the explanation states. “The amendment requires the Legislature to pass laws regarding medical use of marijuana. The amendment does not legalize hemp; it requires the Legislature to pass laws regulating the cultivation, processing, and sale of hemp.”

The initiative calls for a 15 percent excise tax on marijuana sales. That revenue would be used to fund the Department of Revenue’s implementation and regulation of the legal cannabis system, with remaining tax dollars going toward public education and the state general fund.

Ravnsborg said that judicial clarification of the amendment “may be necessary” and notes that marijuana “remains illegal under Federal law.”

The attorney general issued a similar explanation of a proposed constitutional amendment to legalize medical cannabis earlier this month.

This latest move comes one day after advocacy organization New Approach South Dakota announced that their medical marijuana initiative was certified, enabling them to begin the signature gathering process.

Several other cannabis initiatives are in the process of being certified in the state, according to the attorney general’s website. In order to place constitutional amendments on the ballot, activists must collect 33,921 valid signatures from voters.

South Dakota is one of the last remaining states in the U.S. that has not legalized marijuana for any purposes.

GOP Senator Keeps Endorsing Medical Marijuana But Hasn’t Sponsored A Single Cannabis Bill

Photo courtesy of Brian Shamblen.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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Elizabeth Warren’s Plan For Indian Tribes Includes Marijuana Legalization

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) unveiled a plan on Friday that’s aimed at holding the federal government accountable for following through on its obligations to Native American tribes, and that includes ensuring that tribal marijuana programs are protected against federal intervention.

The plan emphasized Warren’s support for a bill she filed earlier this year that “would protect cannabis laws and policies that tribal nations adopted for themselves.”

The 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, who has faced criticism over claims of Native American heritage, pointed to federal reports showing that tribal programs generally have not received adequate funding and said it is imperative that legislation be enacted to “provide resources for housing, education, health care, self-determination, and public safety” for those communities.

To that end, Warren is planning to introduce a bill called the “Honoring Promises to Native Nations Act” alongside Rep. Deb Haaland (D-NM), co-chair of the Congressional Native American Caucus. Before filing, however, the lawmakers are soliciting input on how best to draft the legislation, and are accepting written testimony until September 30.

While the proposed legislation itself doesn’t currently include marijuana-specific provisions, a press release and blog post on the topic address the senator’s sponsorship of the Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States (STATES) Act, which would allow tribal communities and states to set their own cannabis policies without Justice Department interference.

In order to provide economic opportunities to Native people, that “requires streamlining and removing unnecessary administrative barriers that impede economic growth on Tribal lands, respecting tribal jurisdiction over tribal businesses, and promoting forward-looking efforts to ensure full access to new and emerging economic opportunities.”

“For example, while not every tribe is interested in the economic opportunities associated with changing laws around marijuana, a number of Tribal Nations view cannabis as an important opportunity for economic development,” Warren’s campaign blog post states.

“I support full marijuana legalization, and have also introduced and worked on a bipartisan basis to advance the STATES Act, a proposal that would at a minimum safeguard the ability of states, territories, and Tribal Nations, to make their own marijuana policies,” she wrote.

A separate press release on Warren’s Senate website also touts her support for the STATES Act, saying she “worked hard to ensure” that it included tribal protections.

“It’s beyond time to make good on America’s responsibilities to Native peoples, and that is why I’m working with Congresswoman Haaland to draft legislation that will ensure the federal government lives up to its obligations and will empower tribal governments to address the needs of their citizens,” Warren said of the overall tribal plan. “We look forward to working closely with tribal nations to advance legislation that honors the United States’ promises to Native peoples.”

In an email blast to her campaign list, Warren included “a set of additional ideas to uphold the federal government’s trust and treaty obligations with Tribal Nations and to empower Native communities,” which includes her marijuana proposal:

“New economic opportunities: We also need to respect tribal jurisdiction over tribal businesses and promote forward-looking efforts to ensure full access to new economic opportunities. For example, a number of Tribal Nations view cannabis as an important economic opportunity. I support full marijuana legalization and have advanced the STATES Act, a proposal that would safeguard the ability of Tribal Nations to make their own marijuana policies.”

There’s increased interest in ensuring that Native populations receive the same benefits and protections as states as it concerns cannabis legislation.

In June, the House passed a spending bill that included a rider stipulating that Native American marijuana programs couldn’t be infringed upon by the Justice Department. And a GOP representative filed a bill in March that would provide similar protections.

GOP Senator Keeps Endorsing Medical Marijuana But Hasn’t Sponsored A Single Cannabis Bill

Photo elements courtesy of Pixabay and NorthEndWaterFront.com.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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