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House GOP Blocks Marijuana Research Amendment For Veterans

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Once again, the U.S. House Rules Committee has blocked a vote on a cannabis amendment. This time, the proposed measure would have encouraged the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to study the medical benefits of marijuana for military veterans.

The proposal, which Congressman Jared Polis (D-CO) was seeking to attach to the Stop the Importation and Trafficking of Synthetic Analogues Act, a bill dealing with synthetic drugs, would have required the VA to regularly report to Congress about the status of its cannabis research efforts.

Polis also unsuccessfully tried to move an amendment to prevent federal authorities from restricting the use of kratom, a plant that some people use for pain relief.

“The opioid epidemic has affected so many in the U.S., if not directly, indirectly through friends and family. Along with improving access to mental health services, drug abuse treatment, and prevention programs, we need to improve access to alternative pain relief options that work,” Polis said in a press release. “For some, kratom, a cousin of the coffee plant, can be such an alternative. For others, including many veterans, medical marijuana can help manage pain without resorting to more dangerous and addictive prescription opioids. Kratom and medical marijuana should be legal and available to our veterans.”

Under Chairman Pete Sessions (R-TX), the Rules Committee has made a practice over the past several years of blocking marijuana amendments from reaching the House floor.

This Man Is The Reason Congress Can’t Vote On Marijuana Anymore

This time was no different. On a party-line vote of 7 to 4 on Tuesday, the panel blocked the marijuana research amendment from having a chance to be considered on the House floor.

On Wednesday morning, Polis took to the floor to voice his disappointment about his amendments being blocked.

“Many states have medical marijuana available to patients with a variety of health issues, including chronic pain. Doctors across the country have prescribed medical marijuana as a legitimate treatment option for pain management,” he said. “In cases where it works, it provides a less harmful alternative, a less harmful and less addictive alternative to opioids.”

“I’ve heard from so many Coloradans for whom medical marijuana works instead of having to resort to opioids.”

“Unfortunately, medical marijuana is still illegal at the federal level,” Polis said. “There’s limited research opportunities about the safety and efficacy of marijuana, and that’s holding us back from really understanding how medical marijuana can be used for pain management. I offered a very simple and commonsense amendment at the Rules Committee last night that authorized the secretary of Veterans Affairs to study medical marijuana as an alternative treatment option to prescription opioids.”

Polis, who is a member of the Rules Committee, had some choice words for his Republican colleagues who control the panel:

“This bill is being considered under a closed rule. This is the 86th closed rule of this Congress. What that means, Mr. Chairman, not a single member, Democrat or Republican was able to offer an amendment to this bill… And there were good ideas on both sides that weren’t allowed to be advanced. The Republicans continue to bring bills to the floor this way to limit the opportunity for Republicans and Democrats to do something to stop opioid abuse. As a legislator who has a lot of ideas to save lives, increase freedom and decrease opioid abuse that would pass, I think a lot of my ideas would get 350 votes here in the House. We are not allowed to bring them forward. It is just so frustrating when we all know the human face of people that are suffering from being caught in a vicious cycle of opioid addiction and we have seen in our friends and family.”

The overall synthetic drugs bill is expected to receive a House floor vote on Friday.

Read the full text of the rejected marijuana research amendment below:

AMENDMENT TO RULES COMMITTEE PRINT 115–74
OFFERED BY MR. POLIS OF COLORADO

At the end of the bill, insert the following:

SEC. 12. CONDUCT OF RESEARCH INTO EFFECTS OF CANNABIS ON HEALTH OUTCOMES OF CERTAIN VETERANS.

(a) RESEARCH.—In carrying out the responsibilities of the Secretary of Veterans Affairs under section 7303 of title 38, United States Code, the Secretary may conduct and support research relating to the efficacy and safety of medical cannabis on the health outcomes of covered veterans diagnosed with chronic pain, post-traumatic stress disorder, and other conditions the Secretary determines appropriate. The Secretary shall ensure that such research is conducted in accordance with applicable regulations relating to the oversight of research, including such regulations prescribed by the Office of Research and Development of the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Health and Human Services (including through the National Institute on Drug Abuse), the Food and Drug Administration, the Drug Enforcement Administration, and the National Institutes of Health.

(b) DATA PRESERVATION.—Research conducted pursuant to subsection (a) shall include a mechanism to en3 sure the preservation of all data, including all data sets, collected or used for purposes of the research required by subsection (a) in a manner that will facilitate further research.

(c) REPORTS.—During the five-year period beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit periodically, but not less frequently than annually, to the Committees on Veterans’ Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Senate reports on—

(1) the implementation of this section; or

(2) the rationale of the Secretary with respect to determining not to implement this section.

(d) COVERED VETERAN DEFINED.—In this section, the term ‘‘covered veteran’’ means a veteran who is enrolled in the patient enrollment system of the Department of Veterans Affairs under section 1705 of title 38, United States Code.

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Tom Angell is the editor of Marijuana Moment. A 20-year veteran in the cannabis law reform movement, he covers the policy and politics of marijuana. Separately, he founded the nonprofit Marijuana Majority. Previously he reported for Marijuana.com and MassRoots, and handled media relations and campaigns for Law Enforcement Against Prohibition and Students for Sensible Drug Policy.

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