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Congressman Pushes Federal Employment Protections For Marijuana Consumers

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Drug testing policies for federal employees have gone largely unchanged over the past 30 years—and that’s created a conflict for individuals who chose to use marijuana in states that have legalized.

A bill introduced by Rep. Charlie Crist (D-FL) last month aims to resolve that conflict, though. In an effort to protect prospective federal job applicants and workers, the legislation would effectively prohibit employment discrimination against cannabis consumers living in legal states.

One of the primary goals of the legislation is to protect veterans, who comprise about one-third of the federal workforce.

“I think it’s an issue of fairness, and it’s always been, for me, an issue also of compassion,” Crist said at roundtable event about the bill on Wednesday, which involved veterans and members of Florida’s cannabis industry.

“Medical marijuana is an issue of compassion, and in the veterans’ community, access is even more important as more and more veterans are turning to cannabis to address chronic pain and PTSD,” Crist said. “At the same time, the federal government is the largest employer of veterans; however, private cannabis use even in states that have legalized medical marijuana is prohibited in these positions.”

Veterans are more likely than the general population to use cannabis as a treatment option for conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder or chronic pain.

“We appreciate your bipartisan leadership on this issue because it is so essential,” Veterans Cannabis Coalition founder Eric Goepel wrote in a letter of support for the legislation. “Self-care and gainful employment are critical components of life-long success for not just veterans but all Americans.”

“For the federal government to essentially punish citizens, who are under the protection of their state laws, for exercising their right to care for themselves is an affront to personal liberty.”

Cosponsoring the new bill with Crist is Rep. Drew Ferguson (R-GA).

“American workers are reaping the benefits of our growing economy, but some workers are finding themselves caught between federal and state laws governing medical marijuana use,” Ferguson said in a press release. “No one should face unemployment for choosing to pursue private legal medical treatment.”

As the law currently works, veterans and others who seek federal employment can be turned away if they test positive for marijuana metabolites. That’s left many with an uncomfortable choice: stop using marijuana even if it’s proven therapeutic or continuing using and miss out on potential job opportunities.

“The time for the federal government to end the practice of arbitrarily discriminating against current and potential workers for marijuana consumption is now,” NORML political director Justin Strekal said in a press release. “With 47 states having reformed their cannabis laws to be in direct conflict with the federal Controlled Substances Act, individuals acting in compliance with state law should not be denied the opportunity to serve their country as public servants.”

Though exact numbers are hard to come by, earlier reports show that employers in the federal government are at least aware of the problem. In 2014, former FBI director James Comey publicly voiced concerns that the agency’s drug testing policy could complicate recruitment efforts, for example.

“I have to hire a great work force to compete with those cybercriminals, and some of those kids want to smoke weed on the way to the interview,” Comey said at the time.

Crist’s Fairness in Federal Drug Testing Under State Laws Act would not take away an employer’s right to issue probable cause drug tests when a worker is suspected of on-the-job impairment. It also makes an exemption for “individuals occupying or seeking a position requiring a top-secret clearance.” 

Several states have either passed or attempted to pass laws that similarly prevent employment discrimination against marijuana users in legal states, according to NORML. That list includes states like California, Wisconsin, Florida and New Jersey.

But with cannabis still strictly banned under federal law, Crist’s bill seeks to stop employment discrimination at executive branch agencies, getting ahead of the curve to ensure that legal consumers aren’t forced to choose between treatment and gainful employment.

Employment Rights For Marijuana Consumers Would Be Protected Under New Bill

Photo courtesy of M a n u e l.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.

Kyle Jaeger is Marijuana Moment's Los Angeles-based associate editor. His work has also appeared in High Times, VICE and attn.

Politics

Thailand Prime Minister Uses Medical Marijuana At Event With Ganja Mascot

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Top officials in Thailand are getting the word out about medical marijuana—in part by distributing cartoon cannabis dolls and publicly using marijuana oils.

Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha announced the launch of the government’s medical cannabis education site on Wednesday and appeared at an event alongside a person wearing a spectacled marijuana leaf costume called Dr. Ganja. Children were also present, carrying their own Dr. Ganja dolls.

Prayut argued in favor of the therapeutic use of cannabis, stating that it represents a potential treatment option for low-income people in particular. According to The Nation Thailand, he also demonstrated marijuana products, inhaling an oil and applying some to the back of his ears. The prime minister also said he plans to purchase some oils himself.

The government’s education site features information about where to find cannabis clinics, what kinds of products are available and infographics laying out basic research into marijuana.

Via MedCannabis.

Thai lawmakers have made clear their excitement about medical cannabis, with several filmed participating in a ritual dance in August to celebrate the first batch of marijuana oil.

Months after Thailand opted to legalize medical marijuana, the ruling party unveiled draft legislation in September that allows individuals to cultivate up to six cannabis plants for personal use.

GOP Senator Shares Photo Of His Dad Harvesting Hemp Decades Ago

Photo courtesy of Bhumjaithai Party.

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GOP Senator Shares Photo Of His Dad Harvesting Hemp Decades Ago

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A U.S. senator appears to be taking a hit at the governor of his home state over a disagreement on hemp legalization, and he’s using a decades-old picture of his own father growing the crop to do it.

Sen. Mike Rounds (R-SD) shared a photo on Facebook last month showing his dad harvesting the crop in South Dakota about 80 years ago. While it might seem benign, some political observers believe the post was a subtle dig at Gov. Kristi Noem (R), who vetoed legislation earlier this year to re-legalize industrial hemp in the state.

The senator referenced the picture during a telephone town hall event, where he was asked about the potential of hemp in the textile industry. Rounds said the plant was used to make ropes for the Navy during World War II.

“It’s of my dad (Grandpa Don, left) as a young boy working in a South Dakota hemp field,” he wrote of the photo. “We believe it was taken sometime in the late 1930s/early 1940s.”

The implication seems to be that the crop has a long history in South Dakota and that generations have relied on it prior for its federal prohibition. But even after hemp and its derivatives were federally legalized under the 2018 Farm Bill, Noem has maintained that it should remain criminalized under state law.

The Argus Leader first connected the Facebook post with Noem’s hemp opposition.

Marijuana Moment reached out to Rounds’s office for comment, but a representative was not immediately available.

In March, the governor rejected legislation that arrived on her desk to legalize industrial hemp, arguing that the reform move would pave the path toward legalization of adult-use marijuana. The Senate didn’t have enough support to override the veto.

Lawmakers have said they plan to introduce similar legislation next year, but Noem pledged in September to veto it again.

As far as Rounds is concerned, South Dakota should be allowed to experiment with industrial hemp. He told the Sioux City Journal last month that “I personally don’t see a problem with at least trying it” and he voted in favor of the Farm Bill last year.

Despite Noem’s opposition to the non-intoxicating form of cannabis, activists in the state are moving ahead with efforts to more broadly legalize marijuana for medical and recreational purposes. Signatures on two reform initiatives were submitted to the secretary of state last month and, once verified, the issues are expected to be decided by voters during next year’s election.

Both measures are being backed by national advocacy groups, and the adult-use legalization proposal is being sponsored by a former federal prosecutor.

Vermont Should Legalize Marijuana Sales, Top Health Department Official Says

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Killer Mike Credits Bernie Sanders For Inspiring Marijuana Legalization Movement

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Rapper Killer Mike says that the national push to reform marijuana laws in recent years can be largely attributed to Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT).

Sanders, who became the first major presidential candidate to call for cannabis legalization during his 2016 run, has continued to raise the issue as he campaigns for the 2020 Democratic nomination. In the years since he first proposed the policy change, numerous states have pursued reform and pro-legalization stances are increasingly commonplace, especially among Democratic lawmakers.

“Marijuana decriminalization was something I never thought I’d see in my lifetime,” Killer Mike said in an interview on MSNBC on Sunday. “Yet within four years, I’ve seen a nationwide push for it, in big part to his campaign.”

Watch Killer Mike’s marijuana comments, starting around 1:25 into the video below: 

“How does that affect me as the father of a 17-year-old boy? If my son gets caught with marijuana, it could ruin his life for the rest of his life,” he said. “Now we have an environment where he literally will get scolded as a child and get a chance to be a fruitful adult without a felony on his record. I think that that resonates in our community.”

The rapper, who serves as a surrogate on Sanders’s campaign, also talked about the economic potential of legalization and the importance of social equity policies during a town hall event with the candidate in North Carolina in September.

“We have an opportunity this time to take the people that are exiting jail, have expunged records and creating a pathway as wide as this aisle directly to legal marijuana and creating economic sustainability in the same communities that were robbed of that opportunity,” he said at the time.

It’s not just Sanders who deserves credit for contributing to the cannabis reform movement, Killer Mike said at a panel on free speech in June. Rap artists have also played a key role, featuring the plant in music stretching back decades.

“We know that with national decriminalization of marijuana now, a lot of people are going to get credit for it—a lot of activists, a lot of workers,” he said. “But I can show you a line that leads straight back to Cyprus Hill, that leads straight back to Snoop Dogg, that leads straight back to people like Rick James.”

Some of the most impactful work that rappers have produced are songs inspired by social issues like the drug war, he and several other artists argued in a brief submitted to the Supreme Court earlier this year in defense of a rapper who was convicted for threatening Pittsburgh police officers in a song.

AOC Says She’ll Introduce More Psychedelics Legislation In Congress

Photo courtesy of MSNBC.

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