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“Alcohol And Drug Abuse Lake” Is An Actual Place. No, Really

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Spend some time searching the official federal database of geographic landmarks (we’re not actually encouraging you to do this) and you’re bound to come across some delightfully colorful names.

Case in point: Alcohol and Drug Abuse Lake in Richmond County, South Carolina.

Yes, that’s a real thing. A recent TIL (Today I Learned) thread on Reddit elicited similar interest, but no clear answers. Though county officials didn’t confirm with Marijuana Moment by the time of publication, it seems reasonable to assume that the lake was named after the drug and alcohol abuse treatment center, Morris Village, situated adjacent to the waters.

Then there’s Drug Island near the southern tip of Alaska. Information about the origin of this name is also hard to come by, but a 1971 description included in a report from the United States Department of the Interior confirms the official name of the small, 200-foot long piece of land. The local name was apparently attributed to the island by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey in 1920.

Marijuana Tank is a bit harder to wrap one’s head around. The New Mexico reservoir is the only geographic location on the database that explicitly references marijuana. The entry was logged in 1980, but the reservoir has apparently run dry (metaphor?) since then based on satellite imagery.

OK, so what does all of this have to do with the evolution of cannabis policy in the United States?

Nothing, really. At least not as far as we can tell. But it’s mildly interesting, and sometimes we need a little levity in our lives, so we figured we’d share some more of our personal favorites. If you’ve got a unique insight, or fun theory, about these names or their origins, let us know.

Stoner Lake. You can find one anywhere from Blackduck, Minnesota to Nipple Mountain in Colorado. (We’re not in the business of leaping to assumptions, however, so it should be noted that “Stoner” is a somewhat common last name).

Reefer Creek. Seems like a solid hiking spot if you’re in the Lake Superior area.

Bong Bridge. Technically named after U.S. Army Air Corps pilot Richard Ira Bong, the bridge connects Duluth, Minnesota and Superior, Wisconsin. But come on… are you really trying to tell me that local college students don’t go out of their way to toke on Bong Bridge?

Tons of hemp-related geographic locations. About 250, to be precise.

Blunt Run. We’ve all been there, right?

Of honorable mention: Marijuana Moment editor-in-chief Tom Angell helpfully pointed out that a “toke” query pulled up dozens of results.

For what it’s worth, Toke Point looks like a pretty decent smoke spot, not that we can necessarily encourage that sort of thing.

Joe Rogan Challenges Ted Nugent Over Marijuana Views

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.

Kyle Jaeger is Marijuana Moment's Los Angeles-based associate editor. His work has also appeared in High Times, VICE and attn.

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People Searched For A Certain Cannabis Product A Lot In 2018, Google Says

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People in the U.S. were really interested in learning about cannabidiol (CBD) gummies in 2018, according to Google’s year-end trend report.

“CBD gummies” was the third most popular food-related Google search of the year—following unicorn cake and romaine lettuce. If not for a recent E. coli outbreak on the latter product, CBD gummies would seemingly have risen to the number two slot.

Interest in the cannabis product grew throughout 2018.

Via Google.

Searches for the cannabis candy products outpaced those for items like keto pancakes and Necco Wafers this year, according to the tech giant.

The trend data, published on Wednesday, seems to support a recent analysis from Whole Foods Market, which predicted that hemp products will be a top trend heading into 2019.

CBD gummies might also get a boon from the likely passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, which would legalize CBD-producing industrial hemp.

Hemp Will Be A Top 10 Product In 2019, Whole Foods Predicts

Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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Elon Musk: ‘I Have No Idea How To Smoke Pot’

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Elon Musk got himself into a bit of trouble after smoking marijuana during an appearance on Joe Rogan’s podcast in September.

The move reportedly led to NASA launching an investigation into his company SpaceX’s “workplace safety” and “adherence to a drug-free environment.”

But now, in a new interview 60 Minutes, the Tesla founder indicated the on-camera puffing was a fluke and that he actually doesn’t even know how to smoke weed.

“I do not smoke pot,” he said.

“As anybody who watched that podcast could tell, I have no idea how to smoke pot or anything. I don’t know how to smoke anything, honestly.”

Musk seems to be telling the truth, at least judging from the widespread reaction to the fact that he didn’t seem to actually inhale the blunt that Rogan passed him.

The full 60 Minutes interview with Musk is set to air on Sunday.

Elon Musk Smokes Marijuana With Joe Rogan

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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U.S. Air Force Warns About Grandma’s Marijuana-Infused ‘Miracle Sticky Buns’

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The U.S. Air Force wants its members to be extra careful around “grandma’s miracle sticky buns” that might contain marijuana.

In a post on the Air Force Medical Service site on Wednesday, the military branch reminded members that cannabis is illegal under federal law and that testing positive for THC metabolites will result in likely separation from service under “less than honorable conditions” and other possible punishments.

“Marijuana consumption is not permitted in any fashion, period.”

The department stressed that with state-level legalization expanding, there’s wider availability of “THC containing products,” so military members “need to be extra vigilant about the foods and drinks they consume, especially during the holiday season.”

“Many of us attend parties or gatherings with friends and relatives and have meals and libations prepared by others.”

Maybe the Air Force got the memo from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which also recently put out an advisory about holiday-related cannabis consumption and encouraged people to “#DitchDanksgiving.”

While the message was serious, the warning to military members at least ended on a lighter note, seeming to acknowledge the therapeutic use of cannabis edibles, something that federal law still doesn’t officially recognize:

“Your friend’s grandma’s miracle sticky buns might look mighty tasty and get rave reviews at the big shindig, but if you’re in the military or work for the federal government you might want to think twice and make sure they weren’t made to treat her bad hip first before you jeopardize your career.”

To be sure, more seniors are using marijuana, primarily for medical purposes. But unless they’re homemade, marijuana products are generally labeled accordingly. So federal workers should probably pay closer attention to pastry packaging if they want to avoid accidentally ingesting prohibited sticky buns.

The Feds Are Hiring Professional Marijuana Joint Rollers…Kind Of

Photo courtesy of Stacy Spensley.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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