Connect with us

Business

The Best 4/20 Marijuana Tweets From Politicians, Celebs And Brands

Published

on

It’s 4/20, and that means everyone is talking about marijuana — including members of Congress, celebrities and mainstream companies.

Here’s a roundup of some of the best and most interesting cannabis-related tweets from prominent people and businesses…

Congressman Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) delivered a “Cannabis State of the Union” address:

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) posted a thread about his new legislation to deschedule marijuana:

Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) announced she’s introducing legislation to allow medical cannabis in public housing. She also stopped by a marijuana festival in the nation’s capital:

U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-NM) endorsed legalizing marijuana:

U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) tweeted about racial disparities in marijuana enforcement.

U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI) touted legal marijuana’s role in reducing opioid issues:

Congressman Jared Polis (D-CO), a Colorado gubernatorial candidate, toured a marijuana business:

California Treasurer John Chiang (D), also a gubernatorial candidate, toured a local dispensary:

U.S. Sen. Orrin Hartch (R-UT) has a way with words:

Congressman Steve Cohen (D-TN) tweeted a video of himself pressing U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions about whether good people smoke marijuana:

U.S. Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) tweeted about his bill, the Marijuana Justice Act, and he welcomed Sen. Schumer to the cannabis reform movement:

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) tweeted about his recent cosponsorship of Booker’s bill:

Congresswoman Jacky Rosen (D-NV), a U.S. Senate candidate, said she support marijuana legalization when it was on Nevada’s ballot:

U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-OR) said state laws should be respected, and highlighted the important of banking access:

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) said the feds should leave state laws alone:

U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) said it’s time to decriminalize marijuana under federal law…even though she hasn’t signed onto any of the bills her colleagues have introduced that would accomplish that:

California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom (D), a gubernatorial candidate, is calling for federal politicians to step up:

Congresswoman Barbara Lee (D-CA) focused on the damage done by the war on drugs:

Congressman Beto O’Rourke (D-TX), a U.S. Senate candidate, had this to say:

Congressman Mark Sanford (R-SC) tweeted about the need for marijuana businesses to be taxed fairly:

Congressman Ruben Kihuen (D-NV) spoke about the need to increase women and minority ownership on the cannabis industry:

Congressman Tim Walz (D-MN), a Minnesota gubernatorial candidate, tweeted about the importance of allowing research on medical cannabis for veterans, and he called for broader marijuana legalization:

Congressman Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) said that marijuana criminalization distracts resources from more important things:

U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) is happy that more lawmakers are endorsing cannabis law reform:

San Francisco International Airport posted a 4/20 public service announcement:

Chelsea Manning tweeted a message focused on personal autonomy and racial disparities in the drug war:

Illinois Democratic gubernatorial candidate JB Pritzker is criticizing the incumbent governor for preventing medical cannabis expansion:

Congressman Ro Khanna (D-CA) reminds us how popular legal marijuana is with voters:

Congresswoman Suzan DelBene (D-WA) wants to protect local businesses and consumers from federal prosecution:

Congressman Alan Lowenthal (D-CA) touts his support of cannabis legislation:

Indiana Democratic congressional candidate Dan Canon had a little fun:

Congresswoman Colleen Hanbusa (D-HI) wants state laws respected:

Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate Alec Ross released a video filled with marijuana puns:

Congressman Denny Heck (D-WA) wants research on medical cannabis for veterans:

Americans for Tax Reform’s Grover Norquist wants cannabis businesses to be taxed like any other sector:

Burger King understands the value of 4/20 as a marketing hook:

Denny’s makes you go 🤔:

Ben & Jerry’s chimed in a bit early:

Koch Industries wants people to know it supports letting states legalize marijuana:

BMW tweeted that some of its car parts are made from hemp:

Comedian Chelsea Handler suggested that U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions give marijuana a try:

Actress Laverne Cox has never consumed marijuana but is all in favor of legalization:

The Body Shop is offering a 42% discount on products in celebration of 4/20:

The Competitive Enterprise Institute says Jeff Sessions’s position on marijuana is very undudelike:

And of course Snoop Dogg was celebrating:

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.

Tom Angell is the editor of Marijuana Moment. A 15-year veteran in the cannabis law reform movement, he covers the policy and politics of marijuana. Separately, he founded the nonprofit Marijuana Majority. Previously he reported for Marijuana.com and MassRoots, and handled media relations and campaigns for Law Enforcement Against Prohibition and Students for Sensible Drug Policy. (Organization citations are for identification only and do not constitute an endorsement or partnership.)

Business

Square Quietly Launches Program For CBD Cannabis Company Credit Card Processing

Published

on

Companies that sell cannabis products—even those consisting of CBD derived from hemp, which was legalized in the U.S. through the Farm Bill late last year—are continuing to have trouble accessing basic financial services that are available to businesses in other sectors. That includes being able to maintain bank accounts and process their customers’ credit cards.

The latter problem could be solved under a new pilot program that has quietly been launched by the payment processing service Square.

Please visit Forbes to read the rest of this piece.

(Marijuana Moment’s editor provides some content to Forbes via a temporary exclusive publishing license arrangement.)

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
Continue Reading

Business

Facebook Uses Marijuana And Broccoli To Show Off Its AI Tech

Published

on

Marijuana buds and tempura broccoli can look oddly similar out of context, but Facebook’s artificial intelligence (AI) technology can tell the difference.

At its annual developers conference on Wednesday, Facebook CTO Mike Schroepfer discussed how the social media giant is able to leverage visual AI to spot “policy-violating content,” including advertisements to sell cannabis on the platform. He explained the process by comparing images of the fried vegetable next to marijuana buds, which he described as the “most benign possible example” of prohibited content he could find.

Five years ago, the company relied on “behavioral signals” to catch people advertising cannabis—things like whether the advertiser has been “caught for doing bad stuff before” or whether they used “obvious words” like “marijuana” or “drugs” in the post. But as AI advanced, Facebook developed a system that could visually distinguish cannabis from other miscellaneous items.

To drive the point home, Schroepfer put both images on the screen and challenged the audience to differentiate them.

A few people thought the tempura broccoli was marijuana, but most seemed to get it right. The visual algorithm was 94 percent sure that the marijuana was, in fact, marijuana, and 88 percent sure that the other image was the broccoli.

For Facebook, the technology offers a convenient way to streamline its policy enforcement efforts. But for many cannabis reform groups and media companies that run Facebook accounts, the presentation is a window into an ongoing frustration.

The ban on content promoting the sale of federally illicit drugs has had collateral consequences for pages that post noncommercial marijuana material such as news outlets like Marijuana Moment and state regulatory bodies like the Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission. These pages have at times been hidden from search results (a technique referred to as “shadowbanning”) because the algorithm isn’t able to accurately differentiate commercial advertisements from cannabis-related news articles, for example.

Marijuana influencers and state-legal cannabis businesses have long complained about having their accounts on the Facebook-owned Instagram platform temporarily disabled or permanently blocked for depicting cannabis or advertising their services.

A policy change may be on the horizon, as the company said in March that it wants “to consider whether we can loosen this restriction, especially in relation to medical marijuana, legal marijuana and brick and mortar stores.” But for the time being, Facebook will continue to enforce the policy, and it hasn’t provided a status update on that front at the conference so far.

“It’s against our policies because it’s against U.S. federal law, so you can’t advertise marijuana on Facebook,” Schroepfer said.

People Searched For A Certain Cannabis Product A Lot In 2018, Google Says

Photo courtesy of Facebook.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
Continue Reading

Business

FDA Sends Warnings To Three Companies Selling CBD Products

Published

on

At the same time that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is working to create a regulatory framework for hemp-derived CBD, it’s also cracking down on companies that are in its view irresponsibly marketing CBD products and making unsanctioned claims about their medical benefits.

FDA announced on Tuesday that it and the Federal Trade Commission sent warning letters to three such companies last month: PotNetwork Holdings in Florida, Nutra Pure in Washington state and Advanced Spine and Pain in New Jersey. The letters were sent “in response to their making unsubstantiated claims related to more than a dozen different products and spanning multiple product webpages, online stores and social media websites,” FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in a press release.

In a Twitter thread, the commissioner added that he was “concerned to hear recently that several national pharmacy chains and other major retailers have begun to sell or will soon begin to sell” CBD products and that the agency will “be contacting them to remind them of #FDA obligations and our commitment to protect consumers against products that can put them at risk.”

CVS and Walgreens both recently announced they will begin selling CBD-infused products.

In the press release about the warning letters his agency has already sent to CBD companies, Gottlieb asserted that they used their websites to “make unfounded, egregious claims about their products’ ability to limit, treat or cure cancer, neurodegenerative conditions, autoimmune diseases, opioid use disorder, and other serious diseases, without sufficient evidence and the legally required FDA approval.”

FDA is hustling to provide manufacturers guidelines on marketing cannabidiol following the federal legalization of hemp last last year, but the process is complicated by the fact that CBD is the active ingredient in an FDA-approved drug, Epidiolex, and remains the subject of intensive clinical testing. Gottlieb has indicated that it will take years to develop a regulatory plan for CBD without further congressional action.

In the meantime, companies that continue to choose to engage in CBD commerce should be wary about making health claims about their products. The commissioner said FDA has “limited resources” for enforcement operations, but it would take action against companies that make “over-the-line” statements.

In the press announcement, FDA listed some of the unauthorized claims that the three companies made. For example, the products were touted as being able to treat cervical cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and substance use disorder.

“I believe these are egregious, over-the-line claims and we won’t tolerate this kind of deceptive marketing to vulnerable patients,” Gottlieb said. “The FDA continues to be concerned about the proliferation of egregious medical claims being made about products asserting to contain CBD that haven’t been approved by the FDA, such as the products and companies receiving warning letters today.”

“Selling unapproved products with unsubstantiated therapeutic claims can put patients and consumers at risk,” he said. “These products have not been shown to be safe or effective, and deceptive marketing of unproven treatments may keep some patients from accessing appropriate, recognized therapies to treat serious and even fatal diseases.”

Questions about what constitutes an unauthorized claim that would put a company at risk of enforcement action will likely come up at the agency’s just-announced public hearing CBD issues on May 31. Stakeholders are invited to submit information about the public safety impacts of CBD and how to manufacture and market products that contain the cannabis compound.

FDA Announces Details On CBD Public Hearing

This piece was updated to include Gottlieb’s tweets about national pharmacy chains.

Photo courtesy of Nicholas C. Morton.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Stay Up To The Moment

Marijuana News In Your Inbox


Support Marijuana Moment

Marijuana News In Your Inbox