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The Best 4/20 Marijuana Tweets From Politicians, Celebs And Brands

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It’s 4/20, and that means everyone is talking about marijuana — including members of Congress, celebrities and mainstream companies.

Here’s a roundup of some of the best and most interesting cannabis-related tweets from prominent people and businesses…

Congressman Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) delivered a “Cannabis State of the Union” address:

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) posted a thread about his new legislation to deschedule marijuana:

Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) announced she’s introducing legislation to allow medical cannabis in public housing. She also stopped by a marijuana festival in the nation’s capital:

U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-NM) endorsed legalizing marijuana:

U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) tweeted about racial disparities in marijuana enforcement.

U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz (D-HI) touted legal marijuana’s role in reducing opioid issues:

Congressman Jared Polis (D-CO), a Colorado gubernatorial candidate, toured a marijuana business:

California Treasurer John Chiang (D), also a gubernatorial candidate, toured a local dispensary:

U.S. Sen. Orrin Hartch (R-UT) has a way with words:

Congressman Steve Cohen (D-TN) tweeted a video of himself pressing U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions about whether good people smoke marijuana:

U.S. Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) tweeted about his bill, the Marijuana Justice Act, and he welcomed Sen. Schumer to the cannabis reform movement:

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) tweeted about his recent cosponsorship of Booker’s bill:

Congresswoman Jacky Rosen (D-NV), a U.S. Senate candidate, said she support marijuana legalization when it was on Nevada’s ballot:

U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-OR) said state laws should be respected, and highlighted the important of banking access:

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) said the feds should leave state laws alone:

U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) said it’s time to decriminalize marijuana under federal law…even though she hasn’t signed onto any of the bills her colleagues have introduced that would accomplish that:

California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom (D), a gubernatorial candidate, is calling for federal politicians to step up:

Congresswoman Barbara Lee (D-CA) focused on the damage done by the war on drugs:

Congressman Beto O’Rourke (D-TX), a U.S. Senate candidate, had this to say:

Congressman Mark Sanford (R-SC) tweeted about the need for marijuana businesses to be taxed fairly:

Congressman Ruben Kihuen (D-NV) spoke about the need to increase women and minority ownership on the cannabis industry:

Congressman Tim Walz (D-MN), a Minnesota gubernatorial candidate, tweeted about the importance of allowing research on medical cannabis for veterans, and he called for broader marijuana legalization:

Congressman Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) said that marijuana criminalization distracts resources from more important things:

U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) is happy that more lawmakers are endorsing cannabis law reform:

San Francisco International Airport posted a 4/20 public service announcement:

Chelsea Manning tweeted a message focused on personal autonomy and racial disparities in the drug war:

Illinois Democratic gubernatorial candidate JB Pritzker is criticizing the incumbent governor for preventing medical cannabis expansion:

Congressman Ro Khanna (D-CA) reminds us how popular legal marijuana is with voters:

Congresswoman Suzan DelBene (D-WA) wants to protect local businesses and consumers from federal prosecution:

Congressman Alan Lowenthal (D-CA) touts his support of cannabis legislation:

Indiana Democratic congressional candidate Dan Canon had a little fun:

Congresswoman Colleen Hanbusa (D-HI) wants state laws respected:

Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate Alec Ross released a video filled with marijuana puns:

Congressman Denny Heck (D-WA) wants research on medical cannabis for veterans:

Americans for Tax Reform’s Grover Norquist wants cannabis businesses to be taxed like any other sector:

Burger King understands the value of 4/20 as a marketing hook:

Denny’s makes you go 🤔:

Ben & Jerry’s chimed in a bit early:

Koch Industries wants people to know it supports letting states legalize marijuana:

BMW tweeted that some of its car parts are made from hemp:

Comedian Chelsea Handler suggested that U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions give marijuana a try:

Actress Laverne Cox has never consumed marijuana but is all in favor of legalization:

The Body Shop is offering a 42% discount on products in celebration of 4/20:

The Competitive Enterprise Institute says Jeff Sessions’s position on marijuana is very undudelike:

And of course Snoop Dogg was celebrating:

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.

Tom Angell is the editor of Marijuana Moment. A 15-year veteran in the cannabis law reform movement, he covers the policy and politics of marijuana. Separately, he founded the nonprofit Marijuana Majority. Previously he reported for Marijuana.com and MassRoots, and handled media relations and campaigns for Law Enforcement Against Prohibition and Students for Sensible Drug Policy. (Organization citations are for identification only and do not constitute an endorsement or partnership.)

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Senate Schedules Hearing On Marijuana Business Banking Access

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In one of the clearest signs of marijuana reform’s growing momentum on Capitol Hill, a Republican-controlled Senate committee has scheduled a hearing for next week that will examine cannabis businesses’ lack of access to banking services.

The formal discussion in the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs on Tuesday comes as legislation aimed at resolving the marijuana industry’s financial services problems is gaining momentum. A House cannabis banking bill that cleared that chamber’s Financial Services Committee with a bipartisan vote in March now has 206 cosponsors—nearly half the body—while companion Senate legislation has 32 out of 100 senators signed on.

Please visit Forbes to read the rest of this piece.

(Marijuana Moment’s editor provides some content to Forbes via a temporary exclusive publishing license arrangement.)

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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American Bankers Association Demands Answers About Hemp And CBD

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The American Bankers Association (ABA) recently sent a letter imploring top federal financial regulators to provide explicit guidance on how the banking sector can lawfully service hemp businesses.

The letter—sent to the heads of the Federal Reserve, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the Treasury’s Comptroller of the Currency and Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) last week—describes ongoing uncertainty among financial institutions since hemp and its derivatives were federally legalized under the 2018 Farm Bill.

ABA Executive Vice President Virginia O’Neill wrote that “banks remain uncertain about the degree to which they can serve hemp-related companies, and the compliance and reporting requirements that such relationships require.”

“Although other federal regulators have issued helpful clarifications regarding hemp production, banks are subject to a complex set of legal requirements and regulatory expectations and require specific guidance to ensure they are acting appropriately,” she wrote. “Furthermore, the unique nature of hemp as a low-THC strain of marijuana, which remains a Schedule I substance under the [Controlled Substances Act], means banks must have a reliable mechanism to distinguish legal hemp from federally illegal marijuana with extreme confidence.”

There have been other attempts to elicit clarification from federal regulators in the months since hemp was legalized.

Rep. Andy Barr (R-KY) asked FDIC Chair Jelena McWilliams about the issue in May, telling her that he has constituents who’ve told him their access to financial services has “actually deteriorated since we descheduled industrial hemp” and requesting further guidance.

In a similar letter to federal regulators this month, Sen. Michael Bennet (D-CO) also complained about the continued lack of access to banking services for hemp producers. The 2020 Democratic presidential candidate said he hopes the agencies “can work expeditiously and in a coordinated manner to issue guidance describing how financial institutions can offer financial products and services to hemp formers and processors.”

But so far, the closest the regulators have come to assuaging the concerns of banks is a statement from a top Federal Reserve official who said during a Senate hearing earlier this month that “hemp is not an illegal crop.”

ABA said it appreciated the comment but that “a formalized statement from the agencies is necessary to enable banking services for the hemp industry on a meaningful scale.” O’Neill requested confirmation of five specific areas of interest.

“Specifically, we ask that the agencies confirm that:

“—hemp is no longer a controlled substance, effective as of the enactment of the 2018 Farm Bill, and therefore proceeds derived from hemp businesses are not unlawful, and handling those proceeds does not constitute money laundering;

“—banks do not need to file suspicious activity reports solely because a transaction relates to hemp or hemp-derived products;

“—banks can rely on a license issued by a state department of agriculture or the U.S. Department of Agriculture to confirm that a hemp producer is operating in compliance with state and federal law, and that their product qualifies as ‘hemp’ as defined in the 2018 Farm Bill;

“—in accordance with United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) guidance, banks can serve hemp cultivators and processors operating subject to state pilot programs under the 2014 Farm Bill, effective immediately; and

“—as soon as USDA finalizes its regulations related to industrial hemp, banks will be able to serve hemp cultivators and processors operating under state approved plans or direct federal licenses.”

Further, ABA asked for specific guidance as it relates to hemp-derived CBD and information about “the appropriate procedures for sourcing those products back to legal cultivators and processors.”

While the association recognized that “this is an evolving area of law and regulation” and that questions remained among federal regulators about the implementation of hemp legalization, it said that “there are steps that can be taken now to help clarify legal and regulatory expectations for banks in the current environment.”

The letter focused exclusively on hemp and its derivatives, but there’s a simultaneous conversation going on nationally about how financial institutions can work with state-legal marijuana businesses. Bipartisan legislation that would protect banks that service such businesses has the support of all 50 individual state bankers associations.

Read the full ABA letter on hemp banking below:

Regulators Hemp 062119 by on Scribd

Senator Urges FDA To Speed Up CBD Regulations

Photo courtesy of Brendan Cleak.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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Congressional Committee Asks JUUL For Documents On Marijuana Partnerships

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Is the e-cigarette company JUUL planning on expanding its stake in the marijuana industry?

That’s one question the chair of a congressional subcommittee asked the company in a letter concerning JUUL’s role in the “youth e-cigarette epidemic” earlier this month.

Lawmakers have frequently criticized JUUL for making products—specifically flavored e-cigarette cartridges—that allegedly appeal to young people at a time when rates of cigarette use are steadily declining. But while JUUL was developed by the cannabis vaporizer company PAX, it hasn’t announced plans to further partner with marijuana companies.

Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL), who chairs the House Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy, apparently sees the possibility on the horizon, though.

In a letter sent to JUUL on June 7, the congressman said his panel was investigating youth e-cigarette usage and, specifically, how the company’s marketing tactics might be exacerbating the issue. He requested documents on everything from clinical trials on how JUUL devices divert people away from traditional cigarettes to communications on the company’s rationale for the nicotine concentration of JUUL pods.

Tucked within the extensive request is a question about potential marijuana partnerships. Krishnamoorthi asked for:

“All documents, including memoranda and communications, referring or relating to proposals, plans, and/or intended partnerships or collaborations between JUUL and any cannabis-related companies, including but not limited to Cronos Group.”

It’s not clear where the Cronos-specific mention comes from, but the company has perviously caught the interest of the tobacco industry. The maker of Marlboro cigarettes, Altria Group, invested almost $2 billion in the Canada-based cannabis company in December. Two weeks later, Altria invested $13 billion in JUUL.

Marijuana Moment reached out to JUUL, Cronos and Krishnamoorthi’s office for comment, but representatives did not respond by the time of publication.

If a partnership does emerge, it would likely be met with some controversy, as opponents and proponents of marijuana reform alike have long expressed concern that the tobacco industry would take over the cannabis market and commercialize it in a way that mirrors how it peddled cigarettes.

Of course, given that tobacco use is declining and tobacco companies generally have the infrastructure that would make a pivot to cannabis relatively simple, such a partnership would not be especially surprising.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has made the case several times that tobacco farmers in his state could leverage the federal legalization of industrial hemp and its derivatives by growing the crop to offset profit losses from declining tobacco sales.

Read Rep. Krishnamoorthi’s full letter to JUUL below:

2019-06-07.Krishnamoorthi t… by on Scribd

Americans Want CBD Available Over-The-Counter, Poll Finds

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.
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