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Marijuana Policy Project Begins Search For New Leader

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The U.S.’s largest marijuana legalization organization is launching a search process to find its next executive director on Wednesday, Marijuana Moment has exclusively learned.

The Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), which has played a leading role in efforts to reform cannabis policies on the state and federal levels since 1995, was until late last year led by its founder, Rob Kampia.

But Kampia left the organization as greater attention was paid to past allegations of sexual misconduct against him amidst a national focus on workplace sexual harassment and abuse.

Rob Kampia Leaves Marijuana Policy Project

Kampia, for his part, denies that the split had anything to do with his behavior and that he simply wanted to pursue “new business opportunities.”

Now MPP, which has been led on a temporary basis by staffer Matthew Schweich, is looking for Kampia’s permanent replacement.

“Our ideal candidate does not necessarily have a background in marijuana. We are looking for political professionals with experience changing laws, such as a successful campaign manager with a winning track record or a former member of Congress or their staff,” Jeffrey Zucker, chair of MPP’s Board Search Committee, told Marijuana Moment. “But we do want someone with a strong personal commitment to marijuana policy reform, justice and personal liberty.”

The group said in a draft press release that the search will take about three months and will involve targeted outreach to “prominent figures in the fields of politics, social justice and business to ensure the most diverse and inclusive candidate pool possible.”

MPP is especially looking for candidates with political management, fundraising and advocacy experience.

“We are excited to launch this search,” Zucker said. “As a movement, we are close to ending marijuana prohibition in the United States. MPP will continue to play an important role, and we are seeking candidates with experience, expertise and passion for the issue.”

Schweich, the current executive director, will continue leading MPP until a successor is in place and will then focus his attention on the ballot initiative efforts the organization is leading this year, a return to his former role at the organization of leading state campaigns.

“It’s been a privilege to lead this exceptional staff,” he said in the release. “After November, I plan to pursue other opportunities in politics. But first, I want to assist the new executive director during their transition and then help finish what we started in Utah and Michigan. I think both of those ballot initiative campaigns are very important for our movement.”

Meanwhile, Kampia has started a new outfit, the Marijuana Leadership Campaign, which is focused on several of the same state and federal priorities MPP has been working on, leading to some concern that the two groups will compete for resources or duplicate efforts. Kampia has already hired at least one former MPP staffer to join him at the new organization.

See the job posting for the MPP executive director position below:

Job Posting: Executive Director

Lead the marijuana legalization movement.

Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) is the largest organization in the U.S. that’s focused solely on ending marijuana prohibition. The organization is hiring a new Executive Director for the first time since its founding in 1995. MPP works to create a nation where marijuana is legally regulated similarly to alcohol, marijuana education is honest and realistic, and treatment for problem marijuana users is non-coercive and geared toward reducing harm. Marijuana reform is one of the country’s most popular and bipartisan issues, with public support more than doubling over the last 20 years.

MPP has played a leading role in more than half of the current medical marijuana and adult use legalization laws in the country, and the Executive Director should be able to help the organization build on its history of concrete reforms. MPP is lobbying to regulate marijuana like alcohol via several state legislatures: Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maryland, New Hampshire, New Jersey, and Rhode Island. In Michigan, MPP’s coalition is working to legalize and regulate marijuana by voter initiative in 2018. Meanwhile, MPP is also working with patient advocates to advance medical marijuana-related bills in several other states, including Kentucky and South Carolina, while supporting a medical marijuana ballot initiative in Utah. In Congress, MPP has already helped secured protection from federal law enforcement for medical marijuana patients and businesses in the 2018 spending bill and is increasingly lobbying for expanded reforms to banking, research, patient access, and criminal justice.

The Executive Director directly supervises the Chief of Staff and department heads, with responsibility for day-to-day decision-making for the organization. The position develops and implements the organization’s political strategy and goals in conjunction with the staff and Board of Directors. Fundraising is a major part of the job. The position is responsible for the financial stability of the organization and requires a substantial amount of time be dedicated to raising millions of dollars for the organization and campaigns.

Specific responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to:

  • Leading efforts to change laws through political organizing, lobbying, and ballot initiatives.
  • Negotiating with a broad range of stakeholders with interests in policy outcomes.
  • Raising capital from high net worth individuals, companies, and foundations.
  • Creating and executing a fundraising plan with specific outreach goals, timelines, and prospect lists.
  • Managing staff and improving individuals’ effectiveness, productivity, and job satisfaction.
  • Fostering and maintaining a positive work environment for all staff.
  • Communicating with the media to shape public opinion.
  • Leading a diverse movement of passionate individuals and organizations with interests in public health and individual liberty.
  • Ideal candidate will have a track record for fundraising and a demonstrated ability to run a fast-paced, mission-driven organization of 20 or more employees with a primary focus on changing laws.

Additional qualifications:

  • Ten or more years in a professional capacity with increasing levels of responsibility, preferably in politics, public policy, fundraising, or organizational management
  • A track record of executive leadership in growing organizations
  • Excellence in verbal and written communication and interpersonal skills; ability to motivate teams and to participate in and facilitate group meetings
  • Experience in strategic planning and execution; knowledge of contracting, negotiating, and political deal-making
  • Ability to adapt and respond to a rapidly changing environment and to encourage and motivate others to do so
  • Interest in or personal commitment to marijuana policy reform and individual liberty

This position is required to work out of MPP’s Washington, D.C. headquarters, while also requiring frequent travel and hours commensurate with a C-level position. This position reports to the Board of Directors. Compensation will be commensurate with experience.

For confidential consideration, please send a cover letter, resume, and a list of professional references to [email protected]

Learn more about Marijuana Policy Project, our mission, our accomplishments, and our goals at www.mpp.org.

If you value staying updated on cannabis news, please start a monthly Patreon pledge to support Marijuana Moment!

Tom Angell is the editor of Marijuana Moment. A 15-year veteran in the cannabis law reform movement, he covers the policy and politics of marijuana. Separately, he founded the nonprofit Marijuana Majority. Previously he reported for Marijuana.com and MassRoots, and handled media relations and campaigns for Law Enforcement Against Prohibition and Students for Sensible Drug Policy. (Organization citations are for identification only and do not constitute an endorsement or partnership.)

Politics

O’Rourke And Cruz Clash On Marijuana And Drugs At Senate Debate

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Candidates in one of the most contentious U.S. Senate races in the country this year clashed about the issues of marijuana legalization and drug policy reform during a debate on Friday night.

“I want to end the war on drugs and specifically want to end the prohibition on marijuana,” Democratic Congressman Beto O’Rourke said in response to an attack on his drug policy record from Republican Sen. Ted Cruz, whom he is seeking to unseat in November.

During one of the most heated exchanges of the hour-long debate, the GOP incumbent slammed O’Rourke for sponsoring an amendment as an El Paso city councilman in 2009 that called for a debate on legalizing drugs as a possible solution to violence along the Mexican border.

“I think it would be a profound mistake to legalize all narcotics and I think it would hurt the children of this country,” Cruz argued.

He also criticized a bill the Democrat filed in Congress to repeal a law that reduces highway funding for states that don’t automatically suspend drivers licenses for people convicted of drug offenses. “That’s a real mistake and it’s part of pattern,” he said.

“There’s a consistent pattern when it comes to drug use, that in almost every single instance, Congressman O’Rourke supports more of it.”

Calling the issue “personal to me,” Cruz spoke about his older sister, who died of a drug overdose.

“To be clear, I don’t want to legalize heroin and cocaine and fentanyl,” O’Rourke countered.

“What I do want to ensure is that where, in this country, most states have decided that marijuana will legal at some form—for medicinal purposes or recreational purposes or at a minimum be decriminalized—that we don’t have another veteran in this state, prescribed an opioid because the doctor at the VA would rather prescribe medicinal marijuana but is prohibited by law from doing that,” he said.

Enumerating other potential beneficiaries of cannabis reform, the Democrat also referenced an “older woman with fibromyalgia” and “an African-American man, because more likely than not, that’s who will be arrested for possession of marijuana, to rot behind bars, instead of enjoying his freedom and the opportunity to contribute to the greatness of this country.”

Cruz, who called O’Rourke, “one of the leading advocates in the country for legalizing marijuana,” said that he thinks ending cannabis prohibition “is actually a question on which I think reasonable minds can differ.”

“I’ve always had a libertarian bent myself,” he said. “I think it ought to be up to the states. I think Colorado can decide one way. I think Texas can decide another.”

But despite his support for letting states set their own cannabis laws, which he also voiced during his failed candidacy for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, Cruz hasn’t cosponsored a single piece of legislation during his time in the Senate that would scale back federal marijuana prohibition.

Earlier in the debate, the two sparred over the killing this month of Botham Jean, an African-American man shot in his own apartment by a Dallas police officer, a subject about which O’Rourke recently made headlines by calling out in a fiery speech to a black church.

Marijuana In Texas: Where Ted Cruz And Beto O’Rourke Stand On Legalization

Photo courtesy of NBC News.

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Politics

Lawmaker Pushes For Marijuana Legalization In Kenya

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A Kenyan lawmaker is introducing legislation to legalize marijuana nationwide.

Member of Parliament Kenneth Okoth wrote a letter to the National Assembly speaker on Friday, requesting help to prepare the legislation so that it can be published.

The bill would decriminalize cannabis possession and use, clear criminal records of those with prior cannabis-related convictions, enact a legal and regulated commercial sales program and impose “progressive taxation measures” in order to “boost economic independence of Kenya and promote job creation.”

Currently, marijuana (or “bhang,” as it’s locally known) is illegal in Kenya—as it is in most of Africa.

Another provision of the draft legislation concerns “research and policy development.” Okoth wants the country to conduct studies on the medical, industrial, textile and recreational applications of cannabis. And that research would have a “focus on the preservation of intellectual property rights for Kenyan research and natural heritage, knowledge, and our indigenous plant assets,” according to the letter.

“It’s high time Kenya dealt with the question of marijuana like we do for tobacco, miraa, and alcohol,” Okoth wrote on Facebook.

“Legalize, regulate, tax. Protect children, eliminate drug cartels, reduce cost of keeping petty offenders in jail. Promote research for medical purposes and protect our indigenous knowledge and plants before foreign companies steal and patent it all.”

Okoth’s push for legalization in Kenya comes days after South Africa’s Constitutional Court ruled that individuals can grow and use marijuana for personal purposes. The court determined that prohibition violated a person’s right to privacy, effectively legalizing cannabis in the country.

It’ll take a while for Okoth’s bill to move forward. The legislation will need cabinet approval, then it must be published so that all interested parties can review the proposal before it enters into parliamentary debates. Whether Okoth’s fellow lawmakers will embrace the legislation is yet to be seen.

Don’t Legalize Marijuana, UN Drug Enforcement Board Warns Countries

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia.

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Politics

Governor Signs Marijuana Legalization Bill, Making History In US Territory

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With a governor’s signature on Friday, the latest place to legalize marijuana in the U.S. isn’t a state. It’s the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI)—a tiny Pacific territory with a population of just over 50,000.

Under the new law signed by Gov. Ralph Torres (R), adults over 21 years of age will be able to legally possess up to one ounce of marijuana, as well as infused products and extracts. Regulators will issue licenses for cannabis producers, testing facilities, processors, retailers, wholesalers and lounges. Home cultivation of a small number of plants will be allowed.

Please visit Forbes to read the rest of this piece.

(Marijuana Moment’s editor provides some content to Forbes via a temporary exclusive publishing license arrangement.)

Photo courtesy of Max Pixel.

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