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The Cannabis Industry’s Most Influential Event of the Year

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This is a sponsored post by the National Cannabis Industry Association’s Cannabis Business Summit & Expo.

Become a part of the nation’s fastest growing industry this July 25-27 as the National Cannabis Industry Association celebrates five years of bringing together the best and brightest minds at their annual Cannabis Business Summit & Expo in San Jose, CA. See for yourself why industry leaders are calling #CannaBizSummit “a powerhouse of networking and marketing opportunities.” If you are interested in the business of cannabis, this is one event you don’t want to miss.

Register Today!

Prices Increase May 21

“This summit is a once in a lifetime opportunity to meet with like-minded fellow cannabis industry colleagues.” – Karl Keich, Executive Director at Canna Consulting Group

These days, it’s all about who you know, and what better way to get to know people than in a room where all 7,500+ work in the same field? Having an impression on your peers significantly increases the chance for future opportunities and exposure, especially in such a tight-knit industry. We provide an unparalleled opportunity to create lasting business relations with cannabis executives from across the nation.

“Whether you’re in lighting, whether you’re into the manufacturing or the tech. It’s all here, all relevant companies that you can do business with.” – Damien Payne, Firesale

Whether you’re interested in showcasing your products to an audience with the proven highest concentration of legitimate buyers and sellers in the industry, or looking to shop all your business needs, NCIA has got you covered. Shop the SOLD OUT 120,000+ square foot expo floor which features 350+ industry-leading brands displaying their latest products, services, software, and hardware in an effort to aid you and your hunt to solve your business woes.

“Hear from the best of the best speaking in sessions here.” – Jeannette Ward, Director of Data & Marketing at MJ Freeway

Utilizing the knowledge of others gives you a professional competitive edge. You’ll never have enough seniority that you know everything about your industry – especially an industry that evolves as rapidly as the cannabis industry. By harnessing and applying information gathered by your competitors, and keeping up with the latest best practices, you’re sure to stay at the top of your industry. NCIA panels feature a diverse lineup of speakers from cannabis law, tech, and more. With more than 150 thought leaders in five purposefully-constructed tracks, you’re sure to learn something new, and by learning directly from those who are paving the way for us to conduct business, you will receive the most up-to-date information about regulations and policies before the competition, conveniently placing you at the forefront of the industry.

“This show really unites people who are really trying to scale their business and really trying to be an innovator by collaborating with everyone else. NCIA might be the epicenter of the cannabis business-to-business realm.” – Sergio Castro, Convectium

Strengthen this incredible community by learning how fellow attendees have continued their implementation of education and elevation of the industry. Mingle with like-minded professionals with similar business struggles and successes. Learn which strategies work and which aren’t worth your time.

Advocacy. Education. Community.

These three pillars are at the core of the National Cannabis Industry Association. Since day one, NCIA has worked hard to create events that are simply unmatched in quality to ensure that you and your cannabusiness succeed. This three-day educational event is your opportunity to:

• Advocate for YOUR Business – There is strength in numbers; discuss YOUR business needs directly with NCIA as well as how you can make a difference in the movement to reform cannabis policy.

• Educate Your Team – By keeping up on the latest industry best practices, not only will you be enhancing your sales techniques, but you’ll also be sure to stay at the top of the cannabis market.

• Strengthen Your Community – Together, through education and a strong sense of community, we can elevate this industry and eradicate the stigma around cannabis.

The Cannabis Business Summit & Expo experience is one unparalleled by any other industry event. NCIA is in the business of helping you grow YOUR business. Whether you’re an industry pro or a emerging entrepreneur, arm yourself with the latest tips and tricks from across the industry. Tickets are going fast – Don’t miss out.

Register Now

Use Code MOMENT15 to Save 15%

Prices Increase May 21

This is a sponsored post by the National Cannabis Industry Association’s Cannabis Business Summit & Expo.

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Google Execs Told Marijuana Jokes To Lighten The Mood After Trump’s Election, Leaked Video Shows

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Shortly after the 2016 presidential election, Google executives spoke at an all-hands meeting about the political ramifications of Donald Trump’s victory and fielded questions from employees about the path moving forward.

And to lighten the mood, they also cracked a few jokes about marijuana, which had just been fully legalized in California, the home of Google’s headquarters.

“Let’s face it, most people here are pretty upset and pretty sad because of the election,” Google co-founder Sergey Brin said at the beginning of the meeting. “But there’s another group—a small group—that we should also think about who are very excited about the legalization of pot.” 

Employees are heard applauding and laughing in the video, which was leaked to Breitbart by an anonymous source. (The video cannot currently be embedded, but it appears at the top of the page linked above).

“I was asking if we could serve joints outside on the patio, but apparently these things take a little while to take effect,” Brin continued. “It was a huge, huge disappointment.”

“I’ve been bemoaning that all week, I’ll be honest with you.” 

Of course, the meeting took on a more serious tone as executives discussed the policy implications of the incoming Trump administration and the role of Google in the modern political landscape. But the meeting didn’t wrap without one final nod to the passage of Proposition 64 in California.

Asked to weigh in on speculation that economist Jefferey Eisenach would be named as the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Google’s chief legal officer Kent Walker brushed it off with his own marijuana joke. 

“Anybody who thinks they know of the likely members of the Trump administration is taking premature advantage of Sergey’s favorite California proposition,” Walker said. “Nobody knows.”

Just as a matter of housekeeping, California’s adult-use marijuana law went into effect immediately after the proposition’s passage. So technically speaking, anyone 21 or older who would have consumed cannabis after the election wouldn’t be taking “premature advantage” of the law.

Perhaps to that end, Brin closed the post-election event by telling Googlers that “there’s food and drink on the patio,” but warned them to “be careful of the cookies.”

New Book: Obama Considered Decriminalizing Marijuana, But Then Trump Won

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Workers In These Industries Are Most Likely To Consume Marijuana

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It’s become increasingly clear that there’s no single “type” of marijuana consumer. But research has identified certain cultural trends, including a new study that examines the prevalence of cannabis consumption among workers in different industries.

The study, published this month in the International Review of Psychiatry, demonstrates that cannabis use is represented in a wide range of employment backgrounds—and some of the industries where using cannabis is most common might come as a surprise.

Let’s start with the numbers. Here’s a list of industries where workers use the most and least cannabis, which the researchers compiled based on 2013 and 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data. The survey asks respondents whether they’ve used marijuana at least once in the past year.

Industry % marijuana use
Food Services 50.55
Education/Health 46.55
Construction/Mining 41.70
Retail 39.15
Professional 38.76
Manufacturing 21.68
Finance 15.70
Transportation 8.23
Wholesale 7.31
Public Administration 3.86
Agriculture 2.93

Note: Not all industries are represented in this list, which is limited by the data submitted by NSDUH respondents. Also, the study does distinguish different “job categories,” but not within each specific industry.

The point of the study wasn’t simply to show what kind of workers are using marijuana, but also for what purposes. If a survey respondent reported using cannabis in the past year, their use was then categorized as either medical, recreational or mixed (i.e. some of their cannabis consumption was recommended by a doctor, but not all of it).

You can see that breakdown in the table below, but in general, the study reveals a diversity of use types among different industries. People in construction tend to be mixed-use consumers, for instance, and people in food services tend to skew recreational. It’s difficult to explain these sub-trends without more data, however.

Via International Review of Psychiatry.

That said, the researchers were especially interested in cannabis use among construction and mining employees.

“One key difference between the user groups is the higher percentage of medical cannabis users in the construction and mining industries,” they wrote. “This is likely due to the higher injury rates in these industries: construction and mining work require physical stamina, often involve irregular schedules, and expose workers to weather, dangerous tools, and equipment.”

The study notes that there’s conflicting research about marijuana use in these industries, with some arguing that frequent use can result in increased workplace injuries and others contending that the therapeutic use of cannabis “addresses pain and other health problems… that often result from work-related injuries.”

That latter point is also consistent with a study released last month showing “evidence that legalizing medical marijuana improved workplace safety.”

Workplace Deaths Drop After States Legalize Medical Marijuana

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Federal Court Rules In Favor Of Worker Rejected For Medical Marijuana Use

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A Connecticut woman’s rights under that state’s medical marijuana law were violated when a company refused to hire her on the basis of her legal cannabis use, and a lawsuit seeking damages against her would-be employer may proceed, a federal judge ruled.

In 2016, Katelin Noffsinger filed suit against Bride Brook Health and Rehabilitation Center, a federal contractor, after a job offer was rescinded following a positive test for cannabis on a pre-employment drug test.

Noffsinger had accepted a management-level position with the firm, which then scheduled a drug test. Prior to the test, Noffsinger informed Bride Brook that she was a qualified cannabis patient under Connecticut’s Palliative Use of Marijuana Act, and used the drug—namely, synthetic marijuana pills, consumed in the evening—to treat post-traumatic stress disorder following a 2012 car crash.

After learning of Noffsinger’s patient status, Bride Brook officials debated over email the best way to inform her that she could not be hired because of her marijuana use.

After the positive drug test and the subsequent rejection, Noffsinger filed an employment-discrimination lawsuit in state court. The case was elevated to federal court after Bride Brook used federal drug laws—including federal cannabis prohibition—to justify their actions.

Unlike some other states including California, Connecticut’s medical-marijuana law, passed in 2012, offers specific employment protections for cannabis patients.

Employers don’t have to accommodate cannabis use during work hours or employees who are intoxicated in the workplace, but any off-hours marijuana use by a certified patient following state law is protected.

In court filings, Bride Brook argued that the federal Drug-Free Workplace Act preempted such protections.

Because Bride Brook was a federal contractor, it was required to perform such drug tests—and had the firm still hired Noffsinger after the positive drug test, it would have been “defrauding” the federal government, the firm argued.

In a ruling issued last week, U.S. District Court Judge Jeffrey Alker Meyer disagreed.

While Meyer rejected Noffsinger’s requests for summary judgment and attorney’s fees, his ruling means that Noffsinger can now seek monetary damages in a jury trial.

The federal Drug Free Workplace Act requires only that employers make a “good faith effort” to maintain a drug-free workplace, Meyer ruled.

Such efforts include posting warnings about drug use and setting an office policy.

A “zero-tolerance” policy that includes actively testing and then rejecting protected applicants on the basis of a test go above and beyond that threshold, Meyer wrote.

A previous ruling in Noffsinger’s case, also by Meyer, was the first instance in which a federal judge ruled that the federal Controlled Substances Act does not preempt state medical-marijuana laws that provide employment protections.

Other classes of workers, including workers in “safety-sensitive” positions and employees of the federal government, may have to wait for similar protections.

Employers In Medical Marijuana States Can Still Drug Test Employees, Federal Judge Rules

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